Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

I am expecting my first batch of kids in 7 weeks and I'm getting together everything I need for the birth. I'm wondering if I need a heat lamp. I live in northern California(near San Francisco)and the temperature is usually between 58 and 70 year round but a rare cold snap can bring it below freezing.

I'm worried about a heat lamp being a fire hazard.

  How cold is too cold for newborn kiddys?

Views: 315

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

It's good to be worried about the fire hazards innate in heat lamp use. If it's above 50, and the kids are not in the wind, they should be fine.

I would avoid heat lamps if at all possible. A local farm just lost a barn and 50 calves to a horrible fire because a heat lamp fell into bedding and the entire building was engulfed within a few minutes. It all happened so fast that the building was gone before the family could even get from their house to the barn. 

One of my farmer friends has a really great "fool proof" system for hanging their heat lamps. I need to take a photo, because describing it doesn't really do it justice... 

This year I'm especially cautious because California is having one of the driest winters ever documented. I'll probably bring the mama and kids inside the house, unless Rachel friend's "fool proof" system is as fool proof as those quote marks suggest. :)

Thank you all for the info!! and any further suggestions to come. :D 

It's pretty genius!! They screw a metal elbow shelf bracket into the wall, and then run a key chain ring through the holes at the top of the heat lamp "shade" part... and then put the key chain ring through a hole at the end of the shelf bracket. It would be pretty tricky to undo the set up, and have a lamp fall into the hay. I wish they didn't live so far from me... I'd go take a pic to show. 

Probably, I go to extra lengths because my girls are currently on the covered, enclosed patio which is attached to my house.  I have my lamp(s) attached to a chain which is attached to the support beams.  That chain is connected  to itself with a link so there is no chance of it separating so it can fall.  It would take a major event for it to fall, like the roof caving in.  I would never trust a hook or nail to keep it in place as so many do; a bump could be a tragedy.  I also have it at least four feet away from any flammable surface.  For the new kids, I have it hanging over my warming hut (the bottom of the two-part compost bin).  Do remember, they don't need to be warm (65+ degrees) like a human baby but just need that extra warmth in the air.  I use the bottom of the compost bin because it has the little door they can get through but the adults cannot and it has such a large opening on the top.  I was going to use a PVC barrel like many do but saw this on the way out to get one to cut for a warming hut.  Being an opportunist (and lazy!), I emptied the bin and cleaned it up. It works beautifully.  The second kidding season, I emptied my second one so both litters had their own.

I suspect it is us, their human moms, that need the heat lamps more than they do unless the temps are in the 40s or below as long as they are under shelter with no wind or breeze.

This is a previous thread about warming huts.  The one pictured has the lamp closer than I had mine.  The opening in the top of mine is also larger, but there is little air movement where mine was so just warming the air above it was enough for our temps.
http://nigeriandwarfgoats.ning.com/forum/topics/homemade-warming-hu...

OH MY GOSH!! I have one of those compost bins!! It would be PERFECT for a warming hut!! I don't use it for compost anymore... I will keep this in mind! What a great idea, Glenna! 

If you need a heat lamp -have a look at the ones that Premier sheep supply has.   They are so much safer than the open ones.   Kind of expensive but worth it.   I have several for emergency use.  

I went on the website and did a search and the one that came up was for chickens.  There is two sizes, but both sizes only go up to 6" high.  I would think that would be too low for kids to crawl under.  Do they have a bigger size for goats/sheep? or do you raise it on something to be used for goats?  I do own one for my chickens, and it is a wonderful thing to have.  It is not as cheap as a heating lamp, but I don't mind spending an extra 40 to 60 dollars if I avoid that chance of a fire with much bigger losses.

If you are talking about the Premier heat lamps, you can hang it as high as you want. You would certainly not put it six inches above the ground. We usually have ours about three feet above the ground.


Astrud F. Wheeles said:

I went on the website and did a search and the one that came up was for chickens.  There is two sizes, but both sizes only go up to 6" high.  I would think that would be too low for kids to crawl under.  Do they have a bigger size for goats/sheep? or do you raise it on something to be used for goats?  I do own one for my chickens, and it is a wonderful thing to have.  It is not as cheap as a heating lamp, but I don't mind spending an extra 40 to 60 dollars if I avoid that chance of a fire with much bigger losses.

Great suggestions everyone!

I'm still not sure if I should at least have a heat lamp on hand, But here's my set up plans so far:

I have a large dog exercise pen with 4 ft tall panels and an area of between 12 and 24 sq ft, depending a how its set up.

So, My Plan is to take the dog pen and zip tie a tarp to the bottom, and cover the tarp with straw. I'll probably set this up inside the house. 

Things I have on hand: Towels, nasal aspirator, iodine, milk replacer, and bottles w/nipples. 

What do you think? Should I have anything else?

Here is a link to a post I made with the set up I mentioned above! http://nigeriandwarfgoats.ning.com/forum/topics/heat-lamp-safety

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Books written by Deborah Niemann

Order this book on Kindle!

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Need goat equipment?

Yogurt Maker

2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

© 2021   Created by Deborah Niemann-Boehle.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service