Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

I have 3 boys I will need to wether. They are 6 and 5 weeks now. I don't plan to have it done until at least 8 weeks. I am trying to decide which method I should go with. Would like to know your experiences with the diff methods. My local vet said the method he uses is to remove the testicles.

Views: 1209

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

When I had my first kids, I had read that banding was inhumane and that surgical was the most humane, so I called the vet and took in two of my bucks. As we are standing in the parking lot of his office, he slices open each half of the scrotum, yanks out the testicle and tosses it on the ground. He says they'll be fine, and you don't sew it up because it will get infected. I thought, "That's humane?" So, I got a bander and started banding the bucklings. Some didn't seem too bothered by it, but some would throw themselves to the ground, try to bite their scrotums, and flip all over the place, screaming. Although there is a theoretical risk of tetanus because it is an anaerobic environment under the band, I never had a problem, and I quit vaccinating kids after about three years.

Three or four years ago, I needed to have an adult goat castrated and the vet was talking about $100, so I decided now might be a good time to spend $50 on a Burdizzo, which is a brand name of an emasculator that crushes the cords that supply blood to the testicles. It is bloodless, and there is no risk of tetanus because the skin is never broken. And unlike banding, which you can't do after the testicles are a certain size (because they don't fit through the band), the Burdizzo can be used on any age or size goat. After using it one season, it immediately became my favorite method. They scream when you do it, but they recover really fast. Within an hour or two, you wouldn't be able to pick the just-castrated bucklings out of a crowd because they're acting normal.

The only thing I don't like about this is that when you sell wethers, some people have a hard time believing they're castrated. I explain the Burdizzo method to them, but I've had people call and say that they didn't think the goat was castrated. The very first year I did this -- and was very unsure of myself -- I even drove four hours one way because a man was insisting that his wether wasn't castrated. I got there to find the wether had testicles the size of almonds at five months of age! They're the size of banty eggs by that age if they're intact. So, that was annoying. Fiasco Farm even has a picture on their website of a Burdizzo kid with his intact brother, and the difference is quite obvious!

Is the longer I wait to do it better with all methods? I have one little guy that is acting like he's a big buck and just noticed today his junk is even coming out now when he gets worked up. He is 6 weeks old tomorrow.

I don't do it before a month. I personally don't have very strong feelings about when to castrate, but over the years, I've seen people argue very strongly in a lot of different directions on this topic. I don't think there is really strong evidence for castrating at any particular age.

Is there any downside to the Burdizzo? Because I've seen people argue both ways for the other methods, not sure I've heard anything much about the Burdizzo.

I think with this particular little guy the sooner the better then! He's been acting this way for weeks but I hadn't seen him extend it yet tho!
 
Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

I don't do it before a month. I personally don't have very strong feelings about when to castrate, but over the years, I've seen people argue very strongly in a lot of different directions on this topic. I don't think there is really strong evidence for castrating at any particular age.

Medically, no, there isn't a down side. The only reason some people don't like it is because you don't know immediately whether or not you were successful. And it's $50. Cattle people talk about failure a lot, but the cattle Burdizzo is huge and requires two hands to operate, so I could see missing the cord. With the goat/sheep Burdizzo, I can operate it with my right hand while I'm holding the cord in my left hand, so I know I've crushed it. (I'm right handed, but you could use either hand.)

Hannah Person said:

Is there any downside to the Burdizzo? Because I've seen people argue both ways for the other methods, not sure I've heard anything much about the Burdizzo.

Ok thank you.

That sounds kind of funny, no matter what method you use, you have to remove the testicles or they won't be a wether. Anyway, I always banded mine, mainly because I could do it myself and there is no blood involved.

Actually the Burdizzo does NOT remove the testicles, which is why it can be annoying with buyers. The testicles shrink up over a few months, but the wether will have his scrotum forever. You may not see blood with banding, but a goat can wind up with tetanus because the skin is broken. There usually is a little bleeding when the testicles finally fall off, but most people don't notice when that actually happens. And if you've ever met someone that had an animal with tetanus, it does not sound pretty. I don't think I know anyone who continued banding after that happened once.

Sheila Kirkholm said:

That sounds kind of funny, no matter what method you use, you have to remove the testicles or they won't be a wether. Anyway, I always banded mine, mainly because I could do it myself and there is no blood involved.

My apologies, I hadn't read all the other posts, or I would have learned something new and not sounded so uninformed.  Learn something every day, which is always good, thanks!

Since it doesn't actually remove the testicles, how much do they still act like bucks?

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Actually the Burdizzo does NOT remove the testicles, which is why it can be annoying with buyers. The testicles shrink up over a few months, but the wether will have his scrotum forever. You may not see blood with banding, but a goat can wind up with tetanus because the skin is broken. There usually is a little bleeding when the testicles finally fall off, but most people don't notice when that actually happens. And if you've ever met someone that had an animal with tetanus, it does not sound pretty. I don't think I know anyone who continued banding after that happened once.

Sheila Kirkholm said:

That sounds kind of funny, no matter what method you use, you have to remove the testicles or they won't be a wether. Anyway, I always banded mine, mainly because I could do it myself and there is no blood involved.

It crushes the blood vessels that go to the testicles, so they die and shrivel up. Testosterone is no longer produced, so they are just as castrated and sterile as a buck whose testicles were cut off. Depending upon how old they are when you castrate, the testicles may take a couple months or longer to shrivel up. They don't act any more bucky than one that was castrated in another way, which can vary from wether to wether. They don't know that they're not real bucks, so they will mount does in heat, but they don't do nasty buck things like pee on their faces, and they don't usually grow much of a beard if any.

Hannah Person said:

Since it doesn't actually remove the testicles, how much do they still act like bucks?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Books written by Deborah Niemann

Order this book on Kindle!

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Need goat equipment?

Yogurt Maker

2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

© 2021   Created by Deborah Niemann-Boehle.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service