Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

First of all, let me say. I don't like surprises. So I've been reading and learning and talking and learning and learning and learning about goats for some time now. In the process, I've learned that there are some things you need WHEN YOU NEED THEM. The bigger the window of time  you need it and don't have it, the more likely you are to be too late. I also don't have any room or place in my goat barn to store my goat kit, so I am making a portable kit, and I thought I'd share what I've got together with you all. Keep in mind, I've been slowly gathering and getting ready for kidding in the next month, in order to spread my costs out.

 

**Continually editing this post to include the things I've added to my own kit, and to include suggestions given in the comments.**

 

BASICS:

  • Large "tool" box (it's actually like a tote with a tool boxish lid.)
  • Iodine
  • Blood stop
  • Hoof trimmers
  • Dollar Tree "grater" for feet (to use as a hoof rasp)
  • Pet Trimmers
  • Digital Thermometer
  • Ivomec Eprinex Ivermectin Wormer
  • Copper Bolus
  • Brush/De-Shedder
  • Needles/Syringes
  • Vitamin B
  • Nasal aspirator
  • Pro Biotic
  • Udder cream

 

KIDDING SPECIFIC:

  • Old "Tshirt" style sheets cut up into smaller sizes for drying off kids. (I plan to wash and reuse but a friend of mine throws them away)
  • Baby Monitor
  • Shoulder length gloves
  • Lubricant
  • Nutri Drench
  • Unsulfered Black Strap Molasses
  • Heat Lamp/hut for cold weather kidding
  • Kid Box (just a wooden box for kids to snuggle in that a friend made/gave me... the kids like them, I hear.)

 

MILKING SPECIFIC:

  • Today (medication for mastitis)
  • Peppermint Oil (also for mastitis treatment)
  • Henry Milker (great for getting some colostrum from a doe that is too exhausted to stand)

I have a cooler for daily milking. I bring hot soapy water for udder cleaning, and have ice for fast cooling in there too.

 

I'll add some photos after a while... anyone think of anything I'm missing? I know I have more... just need to get it all together. I'll add the other stuff as I remember.

 

Ideas I didn't list from you guys:

  • Selenium E gel
  • CMPK - Calcium in a tube useually given before and after kidding
  • Turkey injector- we use this without a needle to give the CMPK or when we need a large dose of something like nutri -drench for a laboring doe that's getting tired.
  • Tube feeding kit- A 30cc syringe with a little tube attached for feeding a week kid. Good to learn how to do this. I got the vet to show me but there are videos on youtube.
  • Pritchard nipple - just in case you have to bottle feed somebody ::added:: Empty soda bottles or beer bottles for the Pritchards Nipple
  • Injectable Penicillin - just in case. I used it on Indiana when she got Mastitis because I didn't have any Today.
  • Tetanus Anti-Toxin - just in case. Also good if you are going to disbud and tattoo. If you do it yourself you will need this equipment sometime in the future. (not everyone gives tetanus shots)
  • Some method of castration for the bucks that don't meet your standards.
  • Baby Wipes
  • Latex (or alternative) gloves
  • Activated Charcoal to remove toxins if you suspect poisoning
  • Epinephrine (prescription) consider it an essential to have on hand if you vaccinate. Any vaccination, at any time, regardless even of whether they have received that vac before, has the potential to cause an anaphylactic response. It is rare, but it CAN happen. Epinephrine is given IM. The dosage varies, so know your dose/concentration. The med cannot be left in the barn with all the temperature fluctuations...refrigerate it
  • For those with barns far from home for kidding and/or health watch:
    • Snacks for late overnighters
    • hot tea or coffee
    • phone numbers of local goat mentors, vets, etc. for easy access in an emergency

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I have a portable kit too. It stays in my kitchen until I need it.  I think everyone does this a little differently so you might get a lot of suggestions here. These are some things I have that you did not list or that you may want to think about adding over time. Hope this helps.

plain dental floss - I used it to tie off cords and a pair of scissors to cut it if necessary. Only had to do this for 1 out of 5.

Selenium E gel - I had a kid we thought might have had white muscle disease, but I think it's  good to give everybody a little. 

Pro-Bios - good bacteria

CMPK - Calcium in a tube useually given before and after kidding... they hate it

Turkey injector- we use this without a needle to give the CMPK or when we need a large dose of something like nutri -drench for a laboring doe that's getting tired.

Tube feeding kit- A 30cc syringe with a little tube attached for feeding a week kid. Good to learn how to do this. I got the vet to show me but there are videos on youtube.

Pritchard nipple - just in case you have to bottle feed somebody

injectable Penicillin - just in case. I used it on Indiana when she got Mastitis because I didn't have any Today.

Tetanus Anti-Toxin - just in case. Also good if you are going to disbud and tattoo. If you do it yourself you will need this equipment sometime in the future. Also some method of castration for the bucks that don't meet your standards.

Udder cream/balm - skin protectant

You can use the iodine for dipping teats after kids are weened. We use fight bac currently.

Something to clean the udder and your hands. We tried towels but changed to baby wipes after Indiana got Mastitis. I don't know if this is a contributing factor but we have not had any problems since switching.

Might also want to keep regular rubber gloves on hand. Blood stop powder stains your skin so your hands will look dirty for weeks no matter how much you wash them...Personal experience on that one. Also tattooing is messy...

 

 

 

Thanks!! I'm editing the main message with everyone's "other ideas" and adding the things I didn't list the first time around. Thought it would be nice to have one list with ALL the ideas in one place so that a person could just look at it all in one spot and not have to keep reading the whole message thing over and over. :)
That's a cool idea!

Rachel Whetzel said:
Thanks!! I'm editing the main message with everyone's "other ideas" and adding the things I didn't list the first time around. Thought it would be nice to have one list with ALL the ideas in one place so that a person could just look at it all in one spot and not have to keep reading the whole message thing over and over. :)
Well I looked at the very long list and wondered when did goat keeping get so complicated.   I love my goats and they are all healthy. I try to deal with "stuff' as it happens.  My goal in this whole process is to have milk year round and to have babies to enjoy and/or sell.
Jan, the list is more than you'll ever NEED to have, I'm sure. The reason I started it is because when you DO need things, you usually need them fairly quickly, and in my experience with my children, you need it on the weekends when the stores/Dr's are closed. lol I've been trying to build this kit to be prepared for IF something happens.

Here are a couple more I thought of:

 

Epinephrine in case someone goes into shock

Empty soda bottles or beer bottles for the Pritchards Nipple

Activated Charcoal to remove toxins if you suspect poisoning

Thiamine

 

Kare, can you GET epinephrine without a prescription? And can you give me an idea of where/when this is given to goats in particular?

I bought some from my vet.  If you don't have it on hand, it will be too late by the time you get it from a vet.

 

I don't know if it is given IM or SQ

 

It is given when they go into shock, which I think can *sometimes* happen in a reaction to an injection, particularly some antibiotics.  If I'm wrong, someone please correct me. 

Also, when do you use Thiamine? I'd like to specify why/when you need things in the list.

You use thiamine when you suspect Polio or if a goat is down, I think.  It is something a healthy rumen produces and a sick goat can stop producing it, which results in death.  Again, I hope someone else will chime in here.

 

If I would have had it on  hand when my wether died, it might have saved him.

Got it. Thanks!!

Late to the party on this topic but wanted to comment...

I am SO with you, Rachel. Better to have things and not need them than be caught with your pants down and a dead goat. Epinephrine is a prescription drug. I would consider it an essential to have on hand if you vaccinate since any vaccination, at any time, regardless even of whether they have received that vac before, has the potential to cause an anaphylactic response. It is rare, but it CAN happen. We have quickly developed a good relationship with our large animal vet and he has been great about prescribing what I ask for (no he is not irresponsible...he had to meet me and assess me first). Epinephrine is given IM. The dosage the vet listed on my bottle is 0.1ml per 10 pounds. Epinephrine comes in different CONCENTRATIONS...this is for the 1:1000 strength. And though it says SQ also on the bottle, in an emergency I would go IM as fast as I could. The med cannot be left in the barn with all the temperature fluctuations...refrigerate it. Regarding Nutridrench...propylene glycol is cheaper and should be as effective. From my research, nutridrench is basically PG with added minerals/molasses. Probably better for kids, but for a doe in ketosis I'd go for the PG.

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