Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Deborah Niemann-Boehle
  • Female
  • Cornell, IL
  • United States
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Julia @Woody Glen Farm replied to Deborah Niemann-Boehle's discussion Can goats balance their nutrient needs?
"Thank you! Great article!"
Friday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Julia @Woody Glen Farm's discussion New buckling undersized underweight... help!
"Yes, and I'd start feeding him some grain and alfalfa too, if you aren't already. Poor baby needs to gain some weight. I'd probably also treat for coccidia since you saw some in the fecal."
Thursday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Julia @Woody Glen Farm's discussion New buckling undersized underweight... help!
"That looks like hay belly, which they get when they have a heavy load of parasites. Yes, bankrupt worm should show up in a fecal, but they may not always be shedding eggs."
Thursday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Julia @Woody Glen Farm's discussion New buckling undersized underweight... help!
"Do you know what she meant by cocci prevention program? Some are better than others. If his intestines are damaged, he will grow really slowly, and it's anybody's guess as to how big he will get. It shouldn't affect his ability to…"
Wednesday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle posted a discussion

Can goats balance their nutrient needs?

Can animals intuitively balance their diets? Earlier studies in this area said no, even though many organic and grassfed cattle producers have sworn by cafeteria-style minerals for a very long time. This article explains how earlier studies were flawed and how we now understand animals do balance their diets. This is also why you should never mix things (kelp, salt, etc) into your minerals. Animals should have more separate options available, not less, because individual nutrient needs between…See More
Wednesday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Julia @Woody Glen Farm's discussion New buckling undersized underweight... help!
"When you say he didn't have any parasites, do you really mean zero? If you saw absolutely zero, something could have gone wrong with the fecal, so I'd run it again. Although a fecal can confirm a diagnosis of parasites, it does not…"
Wednesday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle and Goat lover101 are now friends
Tuesday
Julia @Woody Glen Farm commented on Deborah Niemann-Boehle's status
"Wow! Congratulations! Your forum is not only extremely helpful but it is a huge success! "
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle posted a status
"We now have 1500 members! And our group turns 5 on Sept. 26!"
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle left a comment for Joe Akers
"Welcome to the group, Joe! You're our 1500th member! And you're right next door to me in Illinois."
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Matt Engel's discussion Buckling...
"I sorry to say that bucks do grow up to be stinky and pee on themselves. Actually they pee on their faces -- yeah, that takes talent! Nigerian bucks, however, are not the obnoxious jerks that bigger bucks are. Most people say their bucks are super…"
Aug 23
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Powdery "Stuff" On Vulva
"Doesn't ring a bell. Could it just be dried mucus or dry skin? Is there a buck in the pen with her all the time?"
Aug 23
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Goat lover101's discussion Goats???
"Lots of us do! :) Where are you located? We have members all over the world. And since it looks like you already have a couple of goats, I'm sure you know that they are all different and have different strengths and weaknesses. Can you tell us…"
Aug 22
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Am I A Goat Mom Again?
"It is good that she is with her mom. There isn't much you can do, other than spending time with her. It varies from goat to goat as far as how long it takes the to deal with new things. Some get over it right away, and some can take close to a…"
Aug 18
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Am I A Goat Mom Again?
"Sorry I'm not clear on the situation. Are you saying you have a single goat? When you say her mom is also crying, do you mean her goat mom or you?"
Aug 18
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Nina L's discussion It's Day 145!!!
"Oh, my!"
Aug 17

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Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Friends

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Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Events

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Discussions

Can goats balance their nutrient needs?

Started this discussion. Last reply by Julia @Woody Glen Farm on Friday. 1 Reply

Can animals intuitively balance their diets? Earlier studies in this area said no, even though many organic and grassfed cattle producers have sworn by cafeteria-style minerals for a very long time.…Continue

Tags: minerals

Using DE as a dewormer

Started Apr 9 0 Replies

Here is an article that summarizes many of the studies done on the use of diatomaceous earth (DE) as a dewormer:…Continue

Tags: DE, parasites, worms

Week one weight gain

Started this discussion. Last reply by Myra Isaac Feb 20. 3 Replies

People have asked about newborn weight gain in the past, and I've said multiple times that I want to keep track of a kids' weights at some point, but I never got around to it ... until now! Actually…Continue

Nutrients in weeds

Started this discussion. Last reply by Chaverah Farm Dec 4, 2013. 1 Reply

Next time a new member talks about ripping up the weeds in their pasture and planting grass, we need to point them to this study:…Continue

Tags: alfalfa, grass, hay, pasture

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Comment Wall (256 comments)

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At 6:25pm on June 11, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

yeah I have a hell of a time on here knowing when someones replied to something

At 8:56pm on June 9, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

the lamancha doe is very gentle with ginny, and ginny actually seems to enjoy the attention. she appears to be a very gentle giant and even against the other lamancha does her threats seem pathetically gentle. and yes we do want a buck, I don't know that as beginners we need a $600 buck to start. your worst quality buck is 100 times better than the barnyard mutts we have around here so something on the cheaper side will work for us. what do you have available? you website gave me the impression all bucks were sold.

 

At 7:38pm on June 3, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

well a 6 yr old Lamancha has apparently taking a likin to Ginny, she follows her around pushing her across the stall with her head, then she will stick her head under Ginnys backend and lift her in the air. Not sure what any of that means but Ginny just stands there patiently and takes it. everyone is still doing good and Ginnys diarrhea appears to have gotten better. we have plenty of room at this farm for a buck and will be seriously looking to purchase one soon, not sure if you have any available or not but, will probably be calling soon.

At 10:00am on June 1, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

oh my god! Gertrude never shuts up! typical female......anyway thought I would let you know the girls are fitting in just fine, they get to meet the lamanchas today. Ginny has a little bit of diarrhea. we gave her probios yesterday so we will see what happens. while neither will take treats from us yet, Ginny is much more skittish than Gertrude so it makes sense to us that she would be the one with diarrhea. we don't think its anything to worry about yet.

At 8:01pm on May 17, 2014, Lyn Adams said…
Hey Deborah, I'd think your opinion on this, a member needs to find a home for her two withers. Do you think it would be a problem if I took them in, right now I have 4 , I was just concerned about them all being together . Can you help?
At 7:55pm on May 7, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

sorry deb just seen the message about reporting the spam to you, but cant find it anymore.

At 7:04am on March 6, 2014, Donna Peck said…

Hi Deborah! Thanks for the welcome. It's good to know that there are people in our corner of the world who are also Nigerian Dwarf owners/enthusiasts! Thank you.

At 7:21pm on February 15, 2014, Juliana Goodwin said…

Hi Deborah I am so sorry!!  I hardly ever use that gmail account anymore and I haven't seen any of this until just now. 

Thank you for letting me know about Lizzie's buck- I am regretfully going to have to pass on him though.  I really had my heart set on the Charlotte buck...I hope I didn't hold you up in advertising him.  I will just forfeit my deposit in case there was any inconvenience in my slow reply.  thanks so much for letting me know.

At 10:44pm on October 26, 2013, Glenna Rose said…

Thank you so much for the link, Deborah!  I already posted it on facebook where my "friends" are already familiar with the antics of mine.  Drug-fighting goats rock!

At 8:06pm on October 8, 2013, Myra Isaac said…
Yes, I'm a Kansas girl! :) I would love to meet you as well!! We're about 5.5 hours from Lawrence in the southwest corner of the state so it's a bit of a drive.

Visit Antiquity Oaks on the Web

Click here to visit the Antiquity Oaks goat website.
Click here to visit the Antiquity Oaks farm website.

Profile Information

If you already have goats, what's your herd name?
Antiquity Oaks originally, but now AOF
If you have a website, what's the address?
http://www.nigeriandwarfdairygoats.com

Antiquity Oaks blog

Want to visit?

Kat doing a goat milking demo in 2012
We are busy getting ready for the Third Annual Livingston County Farm Crawl, which will be held next weekend, August 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. In addition to visiting our farm, you can also visit four other nearby family farms.

Set-up of our soap and wool the first year
Why are we doing this? Well, it all started when I was complaining to a friend one day. You see, we used to get quite a few phone calls and emails from total strangers who wanted to come see our farm in person because they'd seen our website or read one of my books or seen an article and so on. At first it was a lot of fun! But after the tenth or fifteenth time, you start to realize that nothing gets done when you're walking around with visitors chatting -- even when they volunteer to help you, because really, they don't know what they're doing so it takes longer to explain things to them than it would to just do it yourself. So, I decided to set aside a few days each summer just for visitors. Whenever someone would contact me about visiting, I'd suggest that they come on one of our Open Farm days. We did that for a few years, and then one day I was complaining to a farm friend in Iowa about how much work it was to get the farm all gussied up just for a dozen or so visitors. And she said, "Why don't you have a farm crawl?" A what?

I guess pubs are few and far between in Iowa, so instead of pub crawls they do farm crawls. It made sense that if a few farms got together to promote a day where people could visit multiple farms, we would get more visitors. There were four farms total, and we figured that if each of us could get 10 or 20 people to come, that would be 40 to 80 for all four farms. We were all very surprised and excited when we had 300 visitors that first year!

Last year another farm joined, making a total of five farms for people to visit, and this year we've decided to go from Saturday only to Sunday also. If the number of visitors continues to grow, it could get a little crazy on a single day.

You can visit the official Farm Crawl website to see the map and list of farms, which includes what you will see at each farm and what will be available to buy. Here is what will be happening on Antiquity Oaks:

Available to purchase: vegetables, eggs (both chicken and duck), goat milk soap made with organic oils, Shetland wool roving, Shetland and llama yarn, raw Shetland fleeces, Old English Southdown wool batting, naturally colored sheepskins, llama and wool rugs, books on raising livestock, gardening, homesteading, etc. Credit cards accepted.

Demonstrations:
Saturday, 10:30 a.m. Goat milking
Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Solar oven cooking demo
Saturday, 2 p.m. Mozzarella making
Sunday, 11 a.m. Scything (cutting grass hay with a scythe)
Sunday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Solar oven cooking demo
Sunday, 3 p.m. Goat milking

Virtual garden tour

Due to all the challenges that you've all been hearing about over the past few months, things happened later than usual this year, and the garden was no exception. However, we are doing better than I had expected. Here's what it looks like now ...

The perennials are done producing and just hanging out until next year. That's asparagus in the middle, rhubarb on the left and strawberries in the lower right corner...

The tomato plants are still really small ...

but we have tomatoes! They are still green but should be ripening soon. These are chocolate cherry tomatoes, and I can hardly wait. No, they do not taste like chocolate. They are chocolate colored, and they are as yummy as chocolate in their own way. They are definitely my favorite cherry tomato.

The zucchini and patty pan squash are doing great. The row on the left is zucchini, and the row on the right is patty pan squash. They were planted six feet apart, but they are so big, they have eclipsed the walkway. It seems like we can never plant them far enough apart. When you have nothing but seeds in your hands, it always seems like you are giving them more than enough room. I think I may have even posted on here in a previous year that I was going to start planting them eight feet apart.

And here are some awesome peppers that we are trying for the first time -- feher ozon paprika. They are supposed to ripen to a peachy-orange color. It's a sweet pepper, and yes, you can supposedly dry them and grind them up to make paprika.

A month ago, I planted some Swiss chard...


There are also onions and kale, but I didn't get pictures of them. Sunday I planted five types of lettuce in one of the raised beds: flame, Ella Kropf, speckled, Yugoslavian red butterhead, and bunte forellenschluss. Some of the raised beds have hoops on them so that we can cover them and continue to harvest through the winter! Soon we'll be planting more fall crops, such as arugula and more spinach and lettuce, also in the raised beds.

Apples!


This poor tree was planted in 2008, and this is the first year that it has produced more than three or four fruit. Most of our fruit trees are producing a decent harvest by three years of age. Our pears trees produced an average of 27 pounds each in their third year.

I do have to give the apple tree credit for merely surviving, as it is the young fruit tree closest to the barn, which means that whenever the goats accidentally get out, it is the first one to be attacked. You can see that the bark was recently stripped off on the left side of the trunk. Unfortunately, this type of thing happens at least annually.

You may have also noticed the lack of mulch, which doesn't help, as the tree has to compete with the grass and weeds for water and nutrients. As soon as the apples are harvested, I will add compost and mulch. I normally do that twice a year -- in spring and in fall -- but because of my injuries and illnesses the first six months, it was one of the many things that slipped through the cracks. So, I am especially grateful that this little tree pulled through with such a nice harvest!

Update on everything!

Yikes! July is already more than half done! My knee has finally improved enough that I am able to do about 80% of what I normally can do, which is really great news for me and everyone else here.

My baby daughter has flown the coop big time! Even though she had been at the University of Illinois for the past two years, that was less than two hours away. On Friday she moved all the way to Ft. Collins to begin work on her Ph.D. at Colorado State.

And here are a few pictures of things happening around the farm....

We have been teaching Tinker the yearling lady llama to lead, and she is doing splendidly! I never dreamed I would ever have a llama as friendly as her. Most are quite aloof, but Tinker is a true sweetheart, loving attention ...

We just moved the youngest batch of chickens out of the barn and into their bottomless pen (a.k.a. chicken tractor) ...

And the ducklings that hatched a month ago are growing so fast ...

Hope to get another update out before another month passes!

Updates around the farm

Life moves on around here at lightening speed this time of year, regardless of whether anyone is injured or sick or if something gets broken.

I am happy to say that Charlotte is doing very well. She came home the day I slipped and fell in the bathroom, so I have not been able to spend any time with her as it was rather challenging for me to walk more than a few steps after falling and landing on my knee. Mike and the girls took Charlotte's boys out to see her after she got back, but no one seemed to recognize anyone. The kids were only a day and a half old when Charlotte was taken to the University, and she stayed there for a week, so I knew it would be asking for a little miracle for them to recognize each other, but I wanted to at least try. So, the boys are drinking goat milk from a bottle.

Speaking of my knee, I went to the ortho doc a week after falling again, and he talked me into a cortisone injection. After the injection, he said that he would expect it to flare up and get worse for a couple of days. It did flare up, but unfortunately, it lasted for more than two or three days. It is improving a little now, a full week after the injection, but I am still unable to do anything without it swelling up even worse. Physical therapy is supposed to start next Wednesday, but I am not terribly hopeful unless the swelling goes down.

Silver fir tree tomato plant at sundown

We are still planting in the garden, and we are not being helped by a rabbit or two (or five) that is eating bedding plants or newly sprouted seeds. Something ate almost all of our lemon squash plants, as well as a few pepper plants and eggplant plants. Mike chased a rabbit out of the garden yesterday and sealed up the hole in the fence that it came through, but I'm not terribly sure that there are not more of them hiding in the garden area. There are a few places with very tall weeds where they could be living.


Yesterday, 52 baby cockerels arrived from Cackle Hatchery. They are being raised for meat. We were not able to hatch enough chicks this year, so I finally got tired of waiting and ordered some males.

Buff Orpingtons at six weeks of age

We sold the eight Delaware chickens that we hatched, and we have some buff Orpingtons that are now about six weeks old, and we have moved them into a chicken tractor. Once the pullets are big enough, we will integrate them into the laying flock, and the few males that are in there will be used for meat.

Six-week old heritage turkeys, mostly Royal Palm

We moved our turkey poults into a moveable pen also. As they get larger, we will split the group and move half of them into another pen so they are not crowded.


And last but not least, the ducks are doing a good job of reproducing this year. We only have four females, but two have hatched ducklings already! All males will become dinner while the females will be kept to lay eggs next next, as well as to make more ducklings. Yes, the mama is white while the babies are black. We have a black Cayuga drake so we're assuming these are all his babies.

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2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

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