Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Latest Activity

Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Dave Marschang's discussion labor? miscarriage? in heat?
"She has something hormonal going on, but who knows what. Goats can get bred and lose it a week later, especially if they are deficient in copper or selenium. Unless she is screaming in a miserable way as if she's in pain, I wouldn't call…"
6 hours ago
Deborah Niemann-Boehle liked Melonie Kaufmann's photo
6 hours ago
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sarah Boussuge's discussion Do Nigerians lose teeth???
"No, they don't continue to regrow teeth like sharks do. Are you sure she actually lost it? In other words, did she have it to begin with? Goats grow teeth gradually for the first few years, and sometimes they fail to grow one or two at all."
yesterday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Myra Isaac's discussion Drying off doe that has a problem with copper deficiency
"There is no reason to dry up a doe before breeding. The first couple months of pregnancy are not physically challenging for them at all -- assuming they are in good condition. And a goat should not be bred if they are not in good condition.…"
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Myra Isaac's discussion Drying off doe that has a problem with copper deficiency
"In my experience, Molly's did not work well for a goat that had a fairly heavy worm load. She even says on her website that they are for preventing worm overloads, rather than for treating.  When it comes to drug residues in milk, keep in…"
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Winter Weather is Coming
"There is an expiration date on the bottle of goat dewormer. They usually start getting a thicker coat as the weather starts to get colder. Of course that varies from one part of the country (or world) to another. "
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Winter Weather is Coming
"I looked up the goat block on the TSC website, and it has a terribly low amount of copper -- 50 ppm, which is actually what should be in their FEED, not their mineral. A good goat mineral will have about 1500 ppm copper. Odds are extremely good that…"
Monday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Winter Weather is Coming
"What is the name of the block? Dumor makes a lot of different mineral blocks. Is it the goat block, the sheep and goat block, the livestock block?"
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Glenna Rose's discussion Lung worm - source?
"Personally I wouldn't test."
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Michael Garwood's discussion We have started....
"I love all of the info you've shared M.K.! I am currently questioning where that good balance is between thrifty and productive. My best milker (peaked at 6.5 pounds per day in her prime) freshened this year in May, which meant that she was out…"
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Michael Garwood's discussion We have started....
"I think you are correct that using the word "dwarf" is a misnomer for Nigerians. And ultimately they have concluded that the short-legged Irish dexters have a dwarf gene that is synonymous with the bulldog gene -- so as the Australian goat…"
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Sophia A. Heimberg's discussion Winter Weather is Coming
"What is the name of goat mineral? They are all different and some are not as good as others. Is it a loose mineral or tub or block?"
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle replied to Myra Isaac's discussion Drying off doe that has a problem with copper deficiency
"What have you used to treat her for worms?"
Sunday
Deborah Niemann-Boehle left a comment for Myra Isaac
"At the time that we put the angoras in the garden, we only had a 2-foot high chicken wire fence, so it was probably way too easy for a predator to hop over the fence and get them."
Sunday
M. K. left a comment for Deborah Niemann-Boehle
"Rabbits are definately happier in a larger pen, although, my angoras never seemed particularly athletic.  Compared with other breeds, they sat around a lot.  I keep my rabbits in 4 foot by 8 foot wire pens set on the ground.  …"
Sunday
Myra Isaac left a comment for Deborah Niemann-Boehle
"Thanks! Wow that's really sad! I recently got a Great Pyr LGD puppy to hopefully help with our predator issues. He comes from working bloodlines and both parents are guardian dogs as well as grandparents so hopefully he'll be up to the…"
Saturday

Gifts Received

Gift

Deborah Niemann-Boehle has not received any gifts yet

Give a Gift

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Friends

  • Goat lover101
  • Travis and CadeCockburn
  • Elizabeth
  • Myra Isaac
  • Kolti Ishler
  • Hannah Marlar
  • Sophia A. Heimberg
  • Jessica stafford
  • Trish
  • Nicholas Windsor
  • Adele Rodgers
  • Scott McCormick
  • Margaret Langley
  • Cindy Lillich
  • Dawne Shelton

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Discussions

Can goats balance their nutrient needs?

Started this discussion. Last reply by Julia @Woody Glen Farm Aug 28. 1 Reply

Can animals intuitively balance their diets? Earlier studies in this area said no, even though many organic and grassfed cattle producers have sworn by cafeteria-style minerals for a very long time.…Continue

Tags: minerals

Using DE as a dewormer

Started Apr 9 0 Replies

Here is an article that summarizes many of the studies done on the use of diatomaceous earth (DE) as a dewormer:…Continue

Tags: DE, parasites, worms

Week one weight gain

Started this discussion. Last reply by Myra Isaac Feb 20. 3 Replies

People have asked about newborn weight gain in the past, and I've said multiple times that I want to keep track of a kids' weights at some point, but I never got around to it ... until now! Actually…Continue

Nutrients in weeds

Started this discussion. Last reply by Chaverah Farm Dec 4, 2013. 1 Reply

Next time a new member talks about ripping up the weeds in their pasture and planting grass, we need to point them to this study:…Continue

Tags: alfalfa, grass, hay, pasture

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All
 

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Page

Comment Wall (260 comments)

You need to be a member of Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats to add comments!

Join Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

At 7:42pm on September 27, 2014, M. K. said…

Rabbits are definately happier in a larger pen, although, my angoras never seemed particularly athletic.  Compared with other breeds, they sat around a lot.  I keep my rabbits in 4 foot by 8 foot wire pens set on the ground.   The walk-in pens look like little houses.  They  have tarps over the pitched roofs, and  wire floors.   The pens are all kept within the perimeter of a solar charged electronet fence for predator protection.  My charger and fence are from Premier. They are usually a good company to work with.

At 6:44pm on September 27, 2014, Myra Isaac said…
Thanks! Wow that's really sad! I recently got a Great Pyr LGD puppy to hopefully help with our predator issues. He comes from working bloodlines and both parents are guardian dogs as well as grandparents so hopefully he'll be up to the job. I want to build a hutch for my rabbits that has access to some dirt and grass. Completely enclosed with wire buried underneath it or else really deep around the edges. What did you use? I hate having her in that tiny cage even tho I know other people do it. It just seems So tiny and I don't want her to be miserable!
At 2:45pm on September 27, 2014, Myra Isaac said…
Thanks! My new girl was under the weather the other day and I was really worried about wool block. I'm making sure she has some good Timothy hay to much on if she wants now and she seems to be fine. What kind of cages or hutches did you use when you had them? I currently have a wire cage that I put a piece of ply wood in for her to sit on so it's not so hard on her feet. She really likes that board! What did you feed yours?
At 6:50pm on September 22, 2014, Myra Isaac said…
Hi Deborah, I recently purchased an angora rabbit for wool. I have your Homesteading book already but was wondering if you knew of a good Angora care/raising book? Seems like I can't find much online but I probably don't know where to look. Do you know of any good websites? I'd like to have a book with some in depth care/health info for angoras.
At 6:25pm on June 11, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

yeah I have a hell of a time on here knowing when someones replied to something

At 8:56pm on June 9, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

the lamancha doe is very gentle with ginny, and ginny actually seems to enjoy the attention. she appears to be a very gentle giant and even against the other lamancha does her threats seem pathetically gentle. and yes we do want a buck, I don't know that as beginners we need a $600 buck to start. your worst quality buck is 100 times better than the barnyard mutts we have around here so something on the cheaper side will work for us. what do you have available? you website gave me the impression all bucks were sold.

 

At 7:38pm on June 3, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

well a 6 yr old Lamancha has apparently taking a likin to Ginny, she follows her around pushing her across the stall with her head, then she will stick her head under Ginnys backend and lift her in the air. Not sure what any of that means but Ginny just stands there patiently and takes it. everyone is still doing good and Ginnys diarrhea appears to have gotten better. we have plenty of room at this farm for a buck and will be seriously looking to purchase one soon, not sure if you have any available or not but, will probably be calling soon.

At 10:00am on June 1, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

oh my god! Gertrude never shuts up! typical female......anyway thought I would let you know the girls are fitting in just fine, they get to meet the lamanchas today. Ginny has a little bit of diarrhea. we gave her probios yesterday so we will see what happens. while neither will take treats from us yet, Ginny is much more skittish than Gertrude so it makes sense to us that she would be the one with diarrhea. we don't think its anything to worry about yet.

At 8:01pm on May 17, 2014, Lyn Adams said…
Hey Deborah, I'd think your opinion on this, a member needs to find a home for her two withers. Do you think it would be a problem if I took them in, right now I have 4 , I was just concerned about them all being together . Can you help?
At 7:55pm on May 7, 2014, Dave Marschang said…

sorry deb just seen the message about reporting the spam to you, but cant find it anymore.

Visit Antiquity Oaks on the Web

Click here to visit the Antiquity Oaks goat website.
Click here to visit the Antiquity Oaks farm website.

Profile Information

If you already have goats, what's your herd name?
Antiquity Oaks originally, but now AOF
If you have a website, what's the address?
http://www.nigeriandwarfdairygoats.com

Antiquity Oaks blog

Goat breeding challenges

 Elizabeth Taylor

Breeding challenges? What's so challenging? They just do it, right? Well, yeah, but because we want to know who breeds whom, we have to set up the goats on dates. And because we want to know when the kids are due, we wait until the does are in heat and then put them together with the chosen one. That is much easier to do when (a) you have no physical limitations, or (b) you have children with no physical limitations who can help. I used to have both. I currently have neither!

This morning before leaving for work, Mike mentioned to me that Taylor was screaming her head off. Ah, that's who's making that racket out there. I looked out the window, and her wide-open mouth matched the sound of the screams as she stood at the gate to the barn pasture staring towards the buck pens. This should be easy, I thought, because she's a trained milk goat. She runs into the milking parlor twice a day, every day for milking. Well, obviously she was afraid that I had some terrible fate in mind for her because this turned out to be anything but easy!

I went to the pasture and opened the gate so she could come into the pasture where the buck pens are located. She eyed me suspiciously and then ran past me. To complicate matters, this pasture has been rooted up quite a bit by the yearling piglets, so there are lots of holes and little hills that make walking a challenge -- even for someone with a good pair of legs. Don't even think about running, I told myself. Patience is a virtue ... and reduces injuries. But every time I came without twenty feet of Taylor, she'd bolt! You'd have thought the doe had never been touched by human hands in her life.

I wanted to breed her to Monarch, but if I couldn't catch her, that was going to be a challenge. She visited the buck pen where AJ was hanging out with Victoria, a yearling who is being pen bred. She flagged (wagged her tail) at him, and he sniffed her and turned up his lip, meaning that he liked what he smelled. Then she trotted down to the buck pen at the other end of the pasture where Calvin and Austin were staying. She was bred to Calvin last year. I really hoped that she would not plant her feet down there and refuse to move because it was the farthest from where Monarch was staying. Finally she trotted back to AJ, and I decided that it might just be easier to go into AJ's pen and bring him out. After all, there were no other does in the barn pasture. So, I went in there, and AJ ran away from me!

"Seriously, dude? Do you want to have sex today or not? Because if you run away from me, it's not happening!" I took a few more steps towards him, and he ran away again. He is four and a half years old. This is his fifth breeding season. He really should know that when there is a girl in heat, and I come to get him, it means only one thing! "Well, never mind then," I said as I turned and left his pen. "Your loss." I really wanted to breed her to Monarch anyway, so I decided that catching Monarch and bringing him into the barn pasture might be the easiest route.

I went into the little barn where Monarch was staying with the three bottle bucks. Monarch is only six months old, which is why he is still with the baby bucks. I thought it would be easy to catch him because when I was trying to take pictures of him last week, he kept jumping on me. But of course this couldn't be easy either. He came running into the barn from the pasture when I called the boys, but as soon as I tried to catch him, he started running around the stall in a big circle. So, I got a pan of grain and a lead rope. Finally something went right! He went for the grain and didn't care that I was putting a lead around his neck.

As soon as I took him into the pasture, he and Taylor spotted each other. She came trotting over, and he ran to her. He sniffed her, she flagged, he blubbered, she stood, he mounted, she hunched her back indicating a successful mating, and that was that. Yes, it really does happen that fast. Had I blinked, I really would have missed it!

But a single mating isn't always enough, especially with a six-month-old buck whose sperm count may not be that high yet. At that point, Taylor decided to play hard to get, so she started trotting around the pasture, and Monarch tried to run after her, dragging me behind him. After about five minutes of this, she decided to stand again, so there was another successful mating. I can't do this all morning, I thought. I should be able to catch Taylor next time she stands for Monarch. So, I grabbed Taylor's collar and led them both into the barn so I could put them into a stall for the day.

 Monarch 
Leading two goats across a pasture -- one by the collar and one with a lead -- is not as easy as it sounds. Monarch is not exactly trained to lead like a dog, so he was zigzagging all over the place and ran around me, wrapping the lead around my legs. Because I had one hand on Taylor's collar, I couldn't move the lead to my other hand. I'm not sure how I got out of there uninjured, but I did eventually get them both into a stall in the barn.

Note to self: Put all of the bucks into their own individual breeding pens, and if a doe is in heat, do not let her into the pasture after the morning milking!


Blogging ... and a visit from my daughter


I've spent a bit of time today looking over old blog posts and remembering how much fun it used to be for me to share my day-to-day life with everyone on here. After eight years on this blog, I am currently on track for having the lowest number of posts in any year. It certainly isn't because we don't have a ton of stuff happening around here. I'd have to say that the opposite is true. I always think about blogging when I'm in the midst of something, but then it just never happens. I want that to change. I still love sharing my stories on here! I know I just have to get back into the habit. Now a lot of little things wind up on Facebook, either on my personal page or on the Antiquity Oaks farm page. However, I still love telling the long stories, so I just have to start doing it again!


So, here is a little something that I've been meaning to share! Remember Margaret? She was only 14 when we moved out here, and she and her sister could have drowned in the flooded creek when trying to rescue some goats back in 2008. Click here for her version of the story. Today she is an electrical engineer in Ft. Worth, TX, which is a lifetime away from the farm in Illinois! She flew up here to help out with the Homesteading Conference over Labor Day weekend, and while she was here, she also helped me with some website things for the farm. While we were outside getting pictures of the goats for the website, I also got a couple pictures of her with some of the animals.

The Farm Crawl went well last month, and then we had the Homesteading Conference (mentioned in the above paragraph), and then I flew out to California to speak at the National Heirloom Expo, and I came home to cold and rain and two mama pigs giving birth in the pasture -- yes, all of that at once!

I realize this is a terrible excuse for a blog post, but hopefully I'll be back in the swing of this blogging thing soon! Although most of this is not terribly exciting, the saga of the pigs giving birth has been quite the drama, and I promise I will tell you the story soon. And yes, I will have adorable piglet pictures!



Stocking up


About a month ago we finally got our first load of hay that will feed our animals through the winter. Since then we got a second and third load of hay, so the barn is filling up fast.

Jonathan, who has now gone off to college, helped stack the first load.


Don't worry. Mike wasn't throwing that bale of hay at Jonathan.

Yeah, I was having fun taking pictures and trying to get all the bales in mid-air.


And this is what it looked like when that first load of hay was stacked. You see who immediately took advantage of that hay stack? (way up on top!)


We all know that the real reason barns have hay stacks is so that the barn cats have a place to hang out. This is Patches, our nine-year-old barn kitty who was dumped out here as a kitten.

Since I took these pictures, we've had two more loads of hay, and this side of the barn now has hay up to the ceiling, and the other side is about half full.

Want to visit?

Kat doing a goat milking demo in 2012
We are busy getting ready for the Third Annual Livingston County Farm Crawl, which will be held next weekend, August 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. In addition to visiting our farm, you can also visit four other nearby family farms.

Set-up of our soap and wool the first year
Why are we doing this? Well, it all started when I was complaining to a friend one day. You see, we used to get quite a few phone calls and emails from total strangers who wanted to come see our farm in person because they'd seen our website or read one of my books or seen an article and so on. At first it was a lot of fun! But after the tenth or fifteenth time, you start to realize that nothing gets done when you're walking around with visitors chatting -- even when they volunteer to help you, because really, they don't know what they're doing so it takes longer to explain things to them than it would to just do it yourself. So, I decided to set aside a few days each summer just for visitors. Whenever someone would contact me about visiting, I'd suggest that they come on one of our Open Farm days. We did that for a few years, and then one day I was complaining to a farm friend in Iowa about how much work it was to get the farm all gussied up just for a dozen or so visitors. And she said, "Why don't you have a farm crawl?" A what?

I guess pubs are few and far between in Iowa, so instead of pub crawls they do farm crawls. It made sense that if a few farms got together to promote a day where people could visit multiple farms, we would get more visitors. There were four farms total, and we figured that if each of us could get 10 or 20 people to come, that would be 40 to 80 for all four farms. We were all very surprised and excited when we had 300 visitors that first year!

Last year another farm joined, making a total of five farms for people to visit, and this year we've decided to go from Saturday only to Sunday also. If the number of visitors continues to grow, it could get a little crazy on a single day.

You can visit the official Farm Crawl website to see the map and list of farms, which includes what you will see at each farm and what will be available to buy. Here is what will be happening on Antiquity Oaks:

Available to purchase: vegetables, eggs (both chicken and duck), goat milk soap made with organic oils, Shetland wool roving, Shetland and llama yarn, raw Shetland fleeces, Old English Southdown wool batting, naturally colored sheepskins, llama and wool rugs, books on raising livestock, gardening, homesteading, etc. Credit cards accepted.

Demonstrations:
Saturday, 10:30 a.m. Goat milking
Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Solar oven cooking demo
Saturday, 2 p.m. Mozzarella making
Sunday, 11 a.m. Scything (cutting grass hay with a scythe)
Sunday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Solar oven cooking demo
Sunday, 3 p.m. Goat milking

Virtual garden tour

Due to all the challenges that you've all been hearing about over the past few months, things happened later than usual this year, and the garden was no exception. However, we are doing better than I had expected. Here's what it looks like now ...

The perennials are done producing and just hanging out until next year. That's asparagus in the middle, rhubarb on the left and strawberries in the lower right corner...

The tomato plants are still really small ...

but we have tomatoes! They are still green but should be ripening soon. These are chocolate cherry tomatoes, and I can hardly wait. No, they do not taste like chocolate. They are chocolate colored, and they are as yummy as chocolate in their own way. They are definitely my favorite cherry tomato.

The zucchini and patty pan squash are doing great. The row on the left is zucchini, and the row on the right is patty pan squash. They were planted six feet apart, but they are so big, they have eclipsed the walkway. It seems like we can never plant them far enough apart. When you have nothing but seeds in your hands, it always seems like you are giving them more than enough room. I think I may have even posted on here in a previous year that I was going to start planting them eight feet apart.

And here are some awesome peppers that we are trying for the first time -- feher ozon paprika. They are supposed to ripen to a peachy-orange color. It's a sweet pepper, and yes, you can supposedly dry them and grind them up to make paprika.

A month ago, I planted some Swiss chard...


There are also onions and kale, but I didn't get pictures of them. Sunday I planted five types of lettuce in one of the raised beds: flame, Ella Kropf, speckled, Yugoslavian red butterhead, and bunte forellenschluss. Some of the raised beds have hoops on them so that we can cover them and continue to harvest through the winter! Soon we'll be planting more fall crops, such as arugula and more spinach and lettuce, also in the raised beds.

Deborah Niemann-Boehle's Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All
 
 
 

Order these books on Kindle!

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Need goat equipment?

2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

© 2014   Created by Deborah Niemann-Boehle.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service