Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Hi guys.  My most educated guess is that my doe is approximately a month prior to kidding.  Do I need to vaccinate her?  What is the shot (is it CD&T?, can I buy it at TSC and give it myself?  If so, what would the dose be for a smaller doe.  She was 40# the first time I took her to the vet but that was during a crisis and I think she was underweight.  I don't know exactly what she weighs now but I think more like 46#, that's not including the pregnant belly. 

 

She already comes in to a stall every night with her little companion due to predators in these parts and I have put them on straw because we just had a cold snap, figured I'd just keep the straw till she kids.  Anything else I really need to do?

 

Thanks

Views: 218

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

If you are going to vaccinate, now is the time to do it. CDT is the vaccine for clostridium (enterotoxemia) and tetanus. The dose is the same regardless of size. I think it's 2 cc, but it's been six or seven years since I quit giving it, so my memory could be rusty. The dose is on the bottle, and you can give it sub-q with a 20 g needle, which is all available at TSC.

Thanks for the info.  If you have time I'd like to know why you don't give it & how that affects kid sales?  Do people care if the kids are not vaccinated, I mean?

 

I know a lot about vaccine dangers & how to get by without vaccines in dogs, but not livestock.  

 

Also, is there any danger to vaccinated her if I am wrong about her due date?  Like if she is closer to kidding than I think? 
 
Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

If you are going to vaccinate, now is the time to do it. CDT is the vaccine for clostridium (enterotoxemia) and tetanus. The dose is the same regardless of size. I think it's 2 cc, but it's been six or seven years since I quit giving it, so my memory could be rusty. The dose is on the bottle, and you can give it sub-q with a 20 g needle, which is all available at TSC.

One more, sorry:

 

Is the CDT specifically for goats or is it an all-stock, or for cattle or what?  I know a lot of the cattle stuff is used off label for goats.

 

Thanks on behalf of myself and my little preggo-saurus.

As far as I know, not vaccinating has not affected kid sales. It is very easy for someone to give the vaccine when they take the kid home, if that's what they want to do. And there are people who sell kids when they're only a few days old, which have to be vaccinated by the buyer, if wanted.

The CDT is for goats and sheep, and people also use it off-label for llamas.

No, there is no danger in vaccinating her if you're wrong about the due date.

I initially vaccinated all my goats the first few years because that's what everyone did, but I was always worried about them having a negative reaction to it. I had a cat that almost died from a vaccine once, so I'd always be holding my breathe for about half an hour after giving vaccines. I also made sure I had a vial of epinephrine with me or only vaccinated during the vet's business hours, so I could rush them over there if necessary.

Tetanus is one of those things that can be on your property -- or not. You don't know until someone gets it. We have clean pastures and stalls though, so it's highly unlikely that the goats would get any type of injury that would break the skin. I castrate using a Burdizzo, so that's not an issue either. Disbudding happens with a 1000 degree iron, which kills everything. I suppose they could get infected when the scab falls off the horn bud, but again we've got clean pastures, so I don't usually see dirt or mud on kids' heads. Overall, I think the risk is pretty low.

As for enterotoxemia -- people argue about this one all day! There are plenty of goats who've died from this that were vaccinated, so there are people who say it's because the vaccine was compromised in some way -- wasn't kept cold all the time or was old. The bottle directions say that it should all be used when opened the first time, yet no one does that. Even vets use a single bottle day after day (or month after month) until it's used up, completely ignoring the manufacturer's directions. There are others who insist that one shot isn't enough, and they're revaccinating every six months, even though the manufacturer doesn't recommend this. In almost ten years, I have only lost one goat to this disease, and it was our own dumb fault for feeding bad grass that had been scythed early in the day and put in a wagon and left to start fermenting in the heat. I think we are incredibly lucky we only lost one doe, and I'm sure that anyone in my situation who vaccinates would have credited the vaccine to the fact that they only lost one goat. I can understand why people fear the disease so much though because it is very sad to see an animal dieing from this. They are obviously in a terrible amount of pain, but it's also not pretty to see an animal reacting from a vaccine.

Well as always I appreciate your thoughtful response.

 

I've bought the stuff now so I suppose I'll go ahead and do it.  Though you brought up a good point about vet's hours and I do believe I'll wait till monday morning now rather than do her on the weekend.   I have never had a wound on a goat except for the polled buck's constant busted head from playing with the wether with scurs (I am thinking of giving that wether away as a companion and getting our buck a polled or disbudded playmate.  I am tired of constant bloody head)

 

 

 

Selling kids a few days old?  I felt bad bringing our doeling home at 2 months.

I actually saw someone on Facebook the other day say she was having a "dripping wet buck sale" and was offering people a deal if they'd pick up bucklings within a day or two of birth. I'd be worried sick if I ever let a kid go that early.

I had a question about the Selenium and Vitamin E shots(?) or gel.  I live in Colorado and looking at the Geological Survey it states that the mean amount of selenium in our county is .973.  So my question is, do I need to worry about giving my goats the Selenium/Vitamin E? Couldn't find much on what the levels need to be not to give them the selenium.  Thanks

That is a good question, and I'm not sure I've actually heard anyone say what it should be. Most people just talk about checking a map, such as this one:

http://www.hoeggergoatsupply.com/info/selenium.shtml

Janel Rickey said:

I had a question about the Selenium and Vitamin E shots(?) or gel.  I live in Colorado and looking at the Geological Survey it states that the mean amount of selenium in our county is .973.  So my question is, do I need to worry about giving my goats the Selenium/Vitamin E? Couldn't find much on what the levels need to be not to give them the selenium.  Thanks

Am I just a big rediculous softy to think that babies need their mothers?

 

Now that I've seen the difference between hen raised chicks and 'bator raised chicks I don't even want to hatch them artificially if I can help it (though if this hawk doesn't leave us alone we're going to have to in order to revive the flock)

 

 

Guineas and turkeys don't do well with babies when free-range, but otherwise, I tend to agree that moms do the best job of raising babies. We put our mama turkeys in moveable pens with their babies so they don't lose them.

Juliana Goodwin said:

Am I just a big rediculous softy to think that babies need their mothers?

 

IMO, dam raised kids have an advantage. They are healthier, and hardier from what I have observed. I think it's a lot like breast feeding a baby. When there's milk involved, there's so much that kids get from their mom's nutritionally. By the same token, there's so much they get from having their mom's with them, and that can't be taught by humans.

It's truly an amazing thing to see how all the pieces fall together for hen raised/brooded chicks isn't it? I was just blown away at how every little detail of chicken life that seems a little senseless or silly all becomes part of a beautiful picture of perfection. Starting with a broody hen that hatches a clutch of eggs. Then the pieces all fall into place one by one and everything makes so much sense, doesn't it?

Yes we had our first broody this past summer and it was truly very special to watch.  She was an outstanding mother.  Our flock is free range but we had moved her into another stall and she stayed in there with the chicks w/ a small outdoor run till they were about 5 weeks old.  We lost one to a hawk before we got wise and put a tarp over the run. 

 

Our starter flock was all bator babies and they wouldn't eat seeds, bugs etc., they didn't know how to do anything because they had no mother.  These chicks learned everything from mom and were accepted easily back into the flock.  Seeing them perched under her wing at night when they were like 3 weeks old I remember thinking, "there is no way a heat lamp is adequate after seeing this"  Hearing her talk to them, she had a word for "freeze and be quiet" and a word for "here, eat this" and so on.  Really special.  And she seemed to be in such a zen state while sitting on her clutch. 

 

At any rate, I am rambling.  I emailed my goat's breeder and she said don't worry about pre kidding vaccine, just do the babies at 8 weeks then booster at 12.

 

Is booster the same dose as intial vax?  I didn't want to bother her again.  Thanks!!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Order these books on Kindle!

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Need goat equipment?

2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

© 2014   Created by Deborah Niemann-Boehle.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service