Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Okay, folks, I finally got a good urine sample from Capri.  The test strip is the darkest it can be or sure looks like it.  I have the Propylene Glycol that I picked up with the strips.  Later I will be talking to the vet though who knows how soon since he is in the field so much and likely starts late since he works late.\

What would be the dosage for our ND girls?  I have a small bottle(500 ml) since I knew I would in no way need a full gallon.  Truthfully, I hoped to not need it at all but this is where we are.

Except for being uncomfortable, all seems normal otherwise except the test strip.

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Great thing is that Capri is laying in full view of the camera so I need only look at the t.v. screen to know all is fine.  Her back end is closest to it so any birth activity will be very visible immediately.

Glenna Rose said:

My mind is going a dozen different directions about this and this is a bad time of year for me anyway (it was March 29th when my son died) so my concentration is not the best.  I'll try to answer a couple of things brought up here.  The corn is for energy and protein.  For some reason, vet seemed to think the corn would change the readings.  Maybe I should take urine in the middle of the day or even late morning; maybe first in the morning was not the best idea, maybe that is why the vet wanted another reading before staring the Propylene Glycol.  I found out today there were more factors in my friend's goat's situation and her vet diagnosed based on physical activity rather than a test.  While it doesn't help her sweet girl, it makes me feel a bit less worried though I'm not certain I can be at this point.  I'm just a mess.  Two weeks from now I will laugh at all of this paranoia I am having.  All three girls are acting normally and having a good time when I let them out in the yard.  And the youngest is being a real jerk to her mom and sister!  She knows something is up and seems to be quite jealous as well as a brat.

I'll try to post something coherent tomorrow or Saturday, promise.

After my friend's suggestion today, I am not shutting Capri in the kidding stall (which has bothered me) but leaving the door open.  She is laying in there, Summer is under the new sleeping bench, and Ginger is on top of it.  All look happy with their bed decisions.

Glenna, I am so sorry about the lose of your son. I am sure this IS a rough time for you and I will have you in my thoughts today. Remember that today is also the day we recognize as the day of our Saviors death and celebrate this weekend with thoughts of everlasting life. Try to focus on rejoicing in your sons LIFE dear, hard as it may be!

I have just one other thing that I would like to mention here that I have never heard anyone mention. I noticed when reading about this that there needed to be a calorie increase at a certain point in treatment (it was probably if they quit eating) and I don't know if anyone here is familiar with it, but there it a product called DYNE that is excellent for this. Not sure if TSC or Caprine carry it but Jeffers does. I have known about it for many years and it is well respected by many people as a high calorie supplement It could be helpful her and would be great for weak newborns. It looks and smells like condensed milk. So it is pretty rich stuff and I am pretty sure that it has 150 calories per teaspoon. I recently ordered Tilly some, myself. So, I just thought I would share that, in case anyone may want to check into adding it to their medicine cabinet!

Glenna, I wonder if you misunderstood the vet or he misspoke? Corn is lower in protein than just about anything else you could possibly feed a goat. Ketosis usually happens to goats that are either under-nourished or obese, and propylene glycol or NutriDrench (or similar substance) is the usual treatment. If she is shedding that many ketones in her urine to get such a strong positive, something needs to be done ASAP. Have you contacted the vet again? I'd suggest asking him to explain exactly what he thinks is wrong with her and why he doesn't want to give her PG or another high-sugar substance. Is she eating? Is she walking around and as active as normal? Keep us updated!

He may have misspoken but I wrote down what he said as I repeated it, then repeated it at the end of the conversation; a friend was there and I verified it with her after the conversation.  She is a horse person with a long history of dealing with vets as well as various issues (and loves my goats!).  I am really wondering if the strips are bad because undernourished or obese wouldn't be an issue here.  Maybe I am not doing it right and leaving the strip too long with urine on it.  I now have some molasses (unsulphered) as well as the PG.  I am truly hoping this entire thing has been an unnecessary concern.

My friend is more concerned about the worm load and is quite surprised that the vet said they didn't need deworming.  She will be over this afternoon and look at their eyelids.  Ginger's (not pregnant) are the bubble-gum pink, Capri's are light pink (not grey or white), but Summer is unknown at this point.  I wound up on the ground while trying to check her (no photos thankfully!) and will try again when she is trusting me again.  She is my shy one.  My son told me I should try her first because she is the smartest and saw me look at the others and wanted no part of it.  It is quite humilating to "thrown" by a ND.  Since my friend knows what she is doing and will be here today, I thought it best not to stress Summer any more than needed.

Even little things seem to be potentially significant.  Capri will urinate then turn around and smell it and curl her lips like she did when she was in heat.  It seemed logical to me it was pregnancy related but maybe it means something else entirely?  Of course, all three of them are sniffing each other's behinds, especially Ginger with the others.  Ginger has even been trying to nurse and Capri isn't happy about it and one of these times may send her across the yard but has been as gentle as she can to just get her away from her udder.

I will be out in the yard most of the day working and have turned them loose so we can all watch each other better.<g>

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Glenna, I wonder if you misunderstood the vet or he misspoke? Corn is lower in protein than just about anything else you could possibly feed a goat. Ketosis usually happens to goats that are either under-nourished or obese, and propylene glycol or NutriDrench (or similar substance) is the usual treatment. If she is shedding that many ketones in her urine to get such a strong positive, something needs to be done ASAP. Have you contacted the vet again? I'd suggest asking him to explain exactly what he thinks is wrong with her and why he doesn't want to give her PG or another high-sugar substance. Is she eating? Is she walking around and as active as normal? Keep us updated!

Thank you, Margaret. I'm very fortunate to have good support and no (or few) "You should - ers" in my life.  That and I don't run from it or pretend it's all right is what works best for me.

Margaret Langley said:

Glenna, I am so sorry about the lose of your son. I am sure this IS a rough time for you and I will have you in my thoughts today. Remember that today is also the day we recognize as the day of our Saviors death and celebrate this weekend with thoughts of everlasting life. Try to focus on rejoicing in your sons LIFE dear, hard as it may be! {snio}

My friend was here this afternoon.  Though I thought this might be the day (my one-time kidding experience<g>), she thinks it will likely be a couple of days.  She also told me my girls do not display any symptoms of Keotosis and look healthy, not overweight and not thin.  She also said to worm them the day after they kid and will email the dewormer to use.  She said Capri is borderline, based on eyelid color.  When I try to see Summer's eyelids again, that will be telling.  Ginger's were bright pink so no need there.

It is so good to know someone who will come if needed, someone who has goats and knows what to look for.  I so appreciate that she did this and even more that she is a phone call away if there are problems, likely faster than the vet, and has dealt with a variety of issues herself.  She went over with me as to what I had and needed - remarkably, I do have it all now that I bought the bulb syringe yesterday.

Because Ginger has been so confrontive, I'm keeping her away from Capri.  She has been a real stinker and is trying to butt her all the time and constantly challenging her.  Yesterday (I think), she reared up so high she fell over backward - video would have been a hit, but she went right back to do it again.

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