Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

I was wondering if anyone has tried growing fodder as feed. i wanna give it a try. i read posts from @ 2 years ago.thanks

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I have grown comfrey for my goats.  They love it.  It is very high in protein - 22 to 33%.  It is also rich in silicon, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, iodine.  It also has medicinal properties and culinary uses, although it is a bit contraversial since the FDA/USDA does not give it a stamp of approval but most of the rest of the world recognizes it for it nutrient rich properties and healing powers.  Anyway, I have not tried cooking with it yet but the goats love it.  I purchased mine online from Coe's Comfrey, they recommend the Bocking #4 strain for it's nutrient dense properties.  But be wanted that it is a perennial and quite prolific!

I am growing Bocking 14 comfrey for my livestock as well, but I didn't realize it was good for goats---great to know Judy! As far as sprouting goes, yeah, I'm doing some sprouting, but not for my goats (poor guys, I don't do anything special for them, ha ha). I was sprouting for the chickens and rabbits, but I think if I just did a little more, I'd probably be able to sprout a little for our two girls too. Right now, I'm sprouting hard red wheat.

ok comfrey is different  this is an article i seen a couple of years ago in MOTHER EARTH NEWS 

sorry for so long but, well worth the length

enjoy

DIY Sprouted Fodder for Livestock

3/12/2013 2:50:26 PM

Tags: foddernatural feedsprouted grainSarah Cuthill

sprouted fodder seriesSprouting and growing grain for livestock fodder is a simple and efficient way to not only feed your animals a more natural and fresh diet, but is also a practically effortless way to save money. Imagine for a second that the 50 lb. bag of feed you just bought could grow into 300 lbs. of feed that is more nutrient dense in just nine days. Huh wha?! Isn’t just the mere idea of cutting your feed bill worth the try? I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

Sprouting fodder for livestock is similar to sprouting seeds for human consumption, but in an extreme degree. Think more along the lines of sprouting wheatgrass than the little bean sprouts you would put on a sandwich. By sprouting grain and harvesting it (feeding it to your animals) right before the sprouts get their second leaves at about 7-10 days, you do not need to use anything more than water to grow them –not even fertilizer. The action of sprouting amplifies the natural proteins, vitamins, mineral, enzymatic activity, omega 3’s, amino acids, natural hormones, and stimulates immune response. Of course the increase in these wonderful benefits varies grain to grain.

The sprouted fodder, no matter what seed or grain you choose to use, is fed whole; greens, seeds, and sprouts as a whole. Commonly used grains for fodder are barley, wheat, and whole oats. Barley, which is the easiest to grow, has a crude protein percentage of 12.7 percent and a crude fiber percentage of 5.4 percent as a seed. These percentages jump to a crude protein percentage of 15.5 percent and a crude fiber percentage of 14.1 percent after an average of seven days of sprouting. By sprouting, the digestibility of the grain increases from 40 percent to 80 percent so livestock will not need to consume as much fodder compared to commercial feed because they are obtaining more nutrition from a smaller volume of feed.*

As far as setting up your own fodder sprouting system, there are many options out there for purchase. The only problem you will run into is that there are no fodder sprouting systems for smaller operations, like say, a homestead where you only have one horse, or a few goats, or a small herd of rabbits, or a modestly sized flock of chickens. For us, you will be left to build your own. But no worries folks! A system can easily be set up using materials you already have laying around or using items from the local discount or dollar store. You’re in good hands here DIY’ers.

Before we start, you will need to figure out how much finished fodder your animals will be eating on a daily basis. I have included a rough estimate for the more common homestead animals, but please do your own research on feed amounts and if necessary, consult your veterinarian. As any responsible animal or livestock caretaker, you will not only need to transition your animals onto fresh fodder, you will need to monitor their growth and maintenance rates to keep them in a healthy condition while you get used to feeding fodder. Some animals will also require roughage or mineral supplements. Please only use these amounts as a guide.sprouted fodder day 9 

• Horse: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; 1.5% body weight in dry hay

• Beef Cow: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; barley straw ration

• Dairy Cow: 3-5 percent of their body weight in fodder; barley straw ration

• Sheep: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; hay ration

• Goat: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; mineral and hay rations

• Dairy Goat: 3-5 percent of their body weight in fodder; mineral and hay rations

• Alpaca: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; hay ration

• Pig: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder

• Rabbit: 3-5 percent of their body weight in fodder; hay ration for roughage

• Chicken: 2-3 percent of their body weight in fodder; grit and calcium supplements

To get started in growing your own sprouted fodder, you will need:

• 2” deep trays (look for inexpensive baking pans or dish pans at your local dollar store) with a moderate amount of small holes drilled in the bottom.

• bulk bag of untreated, feed grade, whole grain seed; barley, wheat, or oats (oats are the more difficult of the three common grain seeds to sprout and is more prone to mold)

• large bucket

• rack or shelf to keep your trays of seed on

Optional: water pump and hose to re-circulate the water used.

For the best growing results, I recommend that the temperature of your fodder system stays between 63 degrees F and 75 degrees F. The fodder can be grown with only ambient light, so although grow lights or direct sunlight can and will benefit your fodder, direct light is not necessary.

When setting up a rack to put your sprouted fodder trays on, keep in mind that the rack will likely become wet during watering. A simple metal “storage” rack would be wonderful to use especially if a plastic tub of some sort can be placed underneath to catch any water poured through the system. Arrange the fodder trays so that the level below is lined up to catch any water from the tray above. Another good idea would be to drill holes in one side of each tray and then raise the un-draining side by about 1-2 inches. Alternate which side is raised on each consecutive level so that the first tray drains into the second tray, the second tray drains into the third, and so on. You can pour water from a bucket into the first trays or you could set up a small fountain pump on a timer with a hose leading to the top trays to water all of your fodder. Good air circulation is key to keeping mold from growing in your fodder so choose a location for your system that receives plenty of fresh air.

bunny eating fodderHere is an easy system to follow:

(Remember: in order to keep your sprouted fodder growing in a cycle for fresh fodder every day, be sure to start a new batch of seeds every day. )

Step 1: Soak the needed amount of dry seed/grain in a large bucket. Fill the bucket with cool water at least two inches above the seeds. Allow the seeds to soak for 12-24 hours or even overnight. A shorter soak time may result in less seeds germinated.

Step 2: After the seeds have soaked, drain the water and dump the seeds into the appropriate amount of trays. The seeds should never exceed 1/2 inch deep otherwise mold may develop due to poor air circulation.

Step 3: Rinse or water each tray 2-3 times daily. The goal is to provide water for growth, but not allow standing water in the trays. Be sure after watering that each tray has drained well.

Repeat Step 3 for seven to nine days depending on the growth. Ideally, you will have about six inches of growth by day nine. Growth is very dependant on temperature and water.

Step 4: Harvest! Flip your tray over or pull the fodder from the tray and feel confident that you are feeding your animals a more natural feed! Feed the sprouted fodder whole; greens, seeds, and root mat. Because how densely the root mat that develops over the nine days, the fodder can be cut into serving portions with a box-cutter or knife much like a roll of housing carpet.

It really is that simple to grow sprouted fodder for your livestock. Just soak, drain, water and harvest! The most complicated element of this system will be sourcing grain or seeds to use. Of course if you have a local farm supply store, feed supply store, or local grain mill, it will be the most likely place to find seeds to use. Alternatively, seeds or grain in bulk can be found from online resources like Azure Standard, Tractor Supply Company, and state grain mills. A simple google search will probably find just what you need.

If you would like a day-by-day breakdown on starting a sprouted fodder system, visit Sarah’s website for more information.

* Source: Cuddeford (1989), based on data obtained by Peer and Leeson (1985). 

Sarah lives with her husband and young daughter in an old Californian gold-rush town and is learning to be more self-reliant though gardening, animal husbandry, and by making things from scratch. Join her journey from the very beginning and learn along with her on her family’s farm blog, Frühlingskabine Micro-Farm. 

 



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Your Answer

wademm9
2/6/2014 4:18:42 AM
Hi there, I have found a supplier of barley in my country (South Africa) however they sell "clipped barley" and "pearl barley"... which is the best one for fodder growing? Thank you in advance. Regards, Wade
wademm9
2/6/2014 4:18:22 AM
Hi there, I have found a supplier of barley in my country (South Africa) however they sell "clipped barley" and "pearl barley"... which is the best one for fodder growing? Thank you in advance. Regards, Wade
Nena Adamczyk
10/7/2013 10:01:54 PM
thank u so much for the info on fodder. I had heard of it about 40 yrs ago.(when I didn't need the info.,at least I didn't think I would). I am currently starting a small 5 acre farm. we have rabbits, ducks and a pregnant goat. getting 2 weened piglets . the fodder info will be of good use here. thanks
Jorge Manuel Mustonen Morel
4/11/2013 7:56:34 AM
Very good this information. I wll use this information with my chicken. Than you Mother Earth News.
thanks very good info

I would double check the sources used for the comfrey information you posted Dion. I'm still in my preliminary research on it but I've read quite a bit of information that doesn't quite line up with it. People all over the world grow comfrey for their animals oral consumption and many humans also consume it internally (though it has not gotten the green light from the USDA for use on humans here). If it is toxic to the liver I'm pretty sure even having it on your skin would cause damage similar to the way alcohol can cause liver damage even when consumed by means other than consuming it orally (eye shots etc.). I plan to do more research on comfrey before growing it at our home, but that's just my initial two-cents.

Back to your original post though, I don't personally grow fodder but I have a friend who has little systems set up for growing it and uses T5 bulbs with great success. She has a small dairy farm of nubians  and uses it to supplement their feed. She said she has noticed their mineral consumption increase though because they aren't getting the same minerals from the fodder as they do the goat-specific bagged feeds.  I bet youtube would have a lot of helpful information on it as well :)

esertWillow
7/31/2014 12:28:18 AM
Hera123, I'm not an expert on comfrey. I do grow it and use it for poison ivy rash and feed very small amounts to my rabbits if they are under the weather, since old time rabbit breeders swear it keeps them healthy. I've read a fair amount about the historic uses of comfrey, and it has been used for many hundreds of years at least for skin conditions and wounds. I think that in the case of your dog, the benefits definitely outweigh the risks. If it's working, I would continue until the wound is healed. That's a remarkable improvement in your dog's condition, and I hope it will continue and become a full recovery. I also have Labradors and have a soft spot in my heart for them, so I wish you and your dog all the best. Good Luck!
Hera123
7/6/2014 3:54:46 PM
Hi there, I have a question about comfrey. Hopefully someone would have some feedback for me. Two months ago my 12 yr-old Lab dog developed a huge cancerous aggressive and said incurable growth on the surface skin in her hip area. After a surgery to try to remove the cancerous tumor, the growth came back (it was impossible for the vet to remove all the cancerous cells as they infiltrate in all the surrounding tissues). The growth has gotten bigger now (size of a big canteloup). About 2 weeks ago, it has opened up in one spot of the growth, releasing there the blood vessels that this type of cancer is building up (it tries to build up its own blood vessels inside the growth).There is now a 3"x2" cavity within the growth, which I believe has created some kind of a release point. I decided to take care of the wound/cavity myself. About 6 days ago, in addition to disinfecting, etc. I started to put aloe vera and comfrey's fresh leaves in the cavity. What is interesting is that all the blood vessels that the cancer had built up started to dissolve in this cavity and all that was left was my dog's own tissue. In that cavity there was a hole. Upon examining it with my finger I found out empty spaces inside the mass (like a maze), and no blood in it!...which is I believe a good sign! To this day and despite all this my dog still eats well, and doesn't show sign of pain when I dress the wound. So I am not giving up on her. I am not sure what is dissolving all those blood vessels...comfrey? aloe vera? the energy healing and frequencies that my dog is receiving to correct the cancer imbalance, other herbal supplements I give her to boost her immune system and milk thistle for the liver, but something seems to be working and helping dissolve that mass. Plus the skin around the cavity seems to be healing well. Now, I read just recently then that comfrey should not be taken orally and internally because of damage to the liver and to not apply it to an open wound. But some says that it can be taking internally on a short-term basis. So my question is: Would applying comfrey inside my dog's open wound be considered as taking it internally and dangerous for the liver or else of my dog? Or it is OK on a short-term basis? Sorry for the long message. Any feedback would be appreciated.
krystina
6/19/2014 12:13:34 AM
sferguson72 Try Burdock root it is the best blood purifier try one ounce per 100 lbs. eat raw before flower in salads or dry and make as tea. taste like more sweet version of potato. I've nver eaten cooked but raw has amazing flavor. Seed acts similar to flax with different flavor slightly nutty. does not seem to effect celiacs disease as with flax ;)
sferguson72
6/9/2014 11:06:41 AM
I have heard that comfrey can be used as an alternative medicine for liver disease. I was contaminated with bad blood used in a transfusion in 1975> I now am contaminated with hepititus C. I am seeking to a naural product I can take to cleanse the liver. Comfrey would be easy to grow but I am not convinced this is what I am seeking. Taking an internal alternative would be what I am seeking. Any ideas?
cazzie
4/24/2014 1:11:28 PM
I have used comfrey internally (tea) for many decades. It is a demulcent (soothing to mucous membranes) and an expectorant. It has cured many of us of stomach problems and lung problems. Like any other medicine, it is not to be used long term and with careful thought. It got a bad wrap in the early 70's when a very few folks used it excessively and had bad results. How many people have had horrible side effects and even died from modern day medicines-thousands. I will continue to use it, with wisdom, internally.
Pete Truslow
12/10/2008 11:14:18 AM
Would like to start growing Comfrey for my animals. Can you give me the name of a supplier?
jeremiah_2
11/8/2007 1:32:58 AM
here is a bit I just discovered about comfrey: Subject: Comfrey Safety Answered by: Conrad Richter Question from: Tony Staiano Posted on: March 9, 1999 Is comfrey a safe herb? This is a matter of some controversy. There are a number of studies that suggest that comfrey can cause liver damage and tumours. On the other hand, there are many herbalists who believe that comfrey was the victim of inappropriate over-regulation based on dubious scientific and clinical studies. There is no doubt that comfrey has powerful healing properties. We believe that comfrey should have a role in the treatment of short-term illnesses such as acute ulcers, skin problems, etc. Comfrey should not be taken over a long term. In our opinion, the problem for comfrey began when it was touted as the nuttitional supplement, and zealots advocated its daily consumption for its high protein and vitamin B12 content. People were encouraged to eat leaves or take root or leaf powder daily. Some studies showed that continuous, long term ingestion of comfrey can indeed cause liver damage. But when taken over a short term, as is the traditional usage of comfrey, comfrey, in our opinion, poses little risk to health. In any case, the compounds implicated in liver damage are not absorbed through the skin, and so skin creams and ointments make from comfrey do not pose any risk. Can comfrey when taken, cause dizziness ? We have never heard of this effect. There is nothing in comfrey that suggests how it could cause dizziness.
Hannah_3
6/10/2007 5:15:33 AM
I really appreciate this article. We got our first plant yesterday from a local greenhouse. I'm so excited about being able to use it as part of my goat's feed ration.

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pg 1

Growing and Using Comfrey Leaves

Grow comfrey for healing scrapes and bruises, activating compost and conditioning soil.
By Nancy Bubel 
May/June 1974
Share

There are many uses for comfrey, but it should not be taken internally because it is toxic to the liver.
PHOTO: FOTOLIA/ FLORIN CAPILNEAN
 

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Four years ago — mostly from curiosity, because we'd heard so much about the plant's virtues — we set aside a small rectangular spot on our acre for a bed of 30 comfrey cuttings. They grew like mad. We harvested comfrey leaves all summer, and found so many uses for comfrey that, at the end of the season, we ordered 150 additional roots and expanded our little patch to a plantation of 200.

In case you're not familiar with comfrey (Symphytum officinale), it's a member of the borage family, a strong-growing perennial with somewhat hairy leaves 12 to 18 inches long, rising on short stems from a central crown. The flower is a pretty blue bell, fading to pink. We don't wait to see the blossoms, however, because the foliage is at its best if cut before blooming time. The plant reaches a height of over two feet and spreads to more than a yard across, but — since comfrey doesn't throw out creeping roots and hardly ever sets seed — it's remarkably non-invasive for such a sturdy being.

Comfrey leaves have a high moisture content and dry more slowly than some of the herbs you may be used to working with. Just give them a little extra time. Make sure the leaves are crumbly before you store them, though, since any remaining dampness will cause mold. Then pack the foliage into jars and close the containers tightly.

Medicinal Uses for Comfrey

Comfrey has long been used as a cure by Gypsies and peasant peoples, and has an ancient reputation as a mender of broken bones. In her marvelous book Herbal Healing for Farm and Stable, Juliette de Bairacli also recommends it for uterine and other internal hemorrhages and for the healing of wounds. British Gypsies, she writes, feed the roots to their animals as a spring tonic. (Please Note: Comfrey is toxic to the liver for both humans and livestock and should not be taken orally or used on open wounds. —MOTHER.) 

Comfrey contains allantoin, a substance known to aid granulation and cell formation . . . which is what the healing process is all about. The effectiveness of this valuable plant can now be accounted for, and is therefore more widely accepted. (Funny how pinning a name on the curative property makes it possible for us to acknowledge it!) Here on our acre, we follow Mrs. Levy's advice and treat both people and animal hurts with comfrey. Generally we use an infusion (strong tea) of fresh or dried leaves, either to soak a part such as a sore finger or to dab on a cut with cotton. Crushed foliage can be applied externally, or a raw leaf rubbed on skin lesions such as rashes and poison ivy blisters. (Scratch and heal in one operation!) Comfrey should not be applied to open wounds or broken skin.

The most common medicinal use of comfrey are in poultices to help heal swellings, inflammations and sores. To make such a dressing, let the leaves mush up in hot water, squeeze out the excess liquid and wrap several handfuls of the hot, softened foliage in a clean cloth. Apply the pad to the affected part—comfortably hot, but not scalding—and cover the area with a thick folded towel to keep the heat in. The moist warmth enhances the healing effect of the allantoin.

pg 2Growing and Using Comfrey Leaves
Grow comfrey for healing scrapes and bruises, activating compost and conditioning soil.
By Nancy Bubel
May/June 1974

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Poulticing is a warm, comforting treatment, and making one is a caring act . . . something you can actually do for a person. After all, that too counts in the healing process.

Comfrey Can Activate Compost

Town dwellers who must buy manure for their compost piles could save money by keeping a few comfrey plants. Bocking No. 14 — a narrow-leaved, fine-stemmed type with very high protein and potash content — is especially good for kicking the decomposition action into high gear. For best results, scatter comfrey cuttings throughout the compost heap. (Our planting is a mixture of Bocking No. 4 and 14 and we've used the two interchangeably. When time and supply allow selectivity, however, it's good to know about the special properties of each variety.)

You can also condition your soil with comfrey - it's one of the best plants for this. The roots range to depths of 8 to 10 feet, bringing up nutrients from the mineral-rich subsoil, breaking up heavy clay and aerating the land with their channels. The leaves themselves may be buried as "instant compost" to give row crops season-long nourishment.

How to Grow Comfrey

Comfrey may be planted whenever the soil can be worked (the cuttings will do best, however, if transplanted while dormant). We've had good luck with root cuttings started both spring and fall. When we expanded our patch we put out 150 sets in late autumn, with a raw wind in our faces, and every single one made a plant. They came up later in the spring than their full-grown neighbors, but soon bushed out like all the rest. We've even transplanted 50 whole, growing comfrey specimens in midsummer, about the worst time we could have chosen. Cutting off all the leaves, taking a big ball of soil each time and watering very well by bucket brigade kept each of our victims alive . . . better luck than we had any right to expect.

The least expensive way to plant a comfrey patch is with root cuttings (see the box with this article for our supplier's current prices). They come in 2- to 6-inch lengths and are planted in a flat — horizontal — position at a depth of 2 to 8 inches . . . on the shallow side for heavy clay soil, deeper in sandy loam. Even hopeless-looking little nubs of roots can form good plants, so be sure to make use of all those crumbs and pieces in the bottom of the shipping box.

Crown cuttings cost a little more, include eyes or buds and are set out flat at a depth of 3 to 6 inches. We bought some of these along with the root cuttings in our first order. The latter were less impressive at first but soon caught up, and by transplanting time we couldn't tell the difference. Probably any advantage crown cuttings have in size and development is canceled by the greater shock of relocation.

We wouldn't even consider buying a whole plant by mail order. If you can get one locally, however, you can bring it through with good care.

pg 3

Growing and Using Comfrey Leaves
Grow comfrey for healing scrapes and bruises, activating compost and conditioning soil.
By Nancy Bubel
May/June 1974

inShare

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Once you're growing comfrey on your own grounds, propagation can be done by dividing multiple-crowned plants . . . or simply by digging up a piece of root and setting it in the earth as I've described. Magic!

The best planting layout — recommended by North Central Comfrey Producers — is a grid of lines three feet apart each way with the plants located at the intersections. (No, that isn't too much space . . . just wait a couple of years!) This plan leaves clear aisles in all directions for cultivation while the crop is young. We rototill our patch several times a season, and any weeds that remain close to the stalks are sickled down when we harvest.

As easy as comfrey is to grow, it does need good soil. We enrich our patch with manure from the henhouse and goat shed, and add a bag or two of rock powder every three years.

Pests
In the four years we've been growing comfrey, we've seen no insect damage. (Yes, we do know what bugs look like . . . we have 'em on our beans, squash and cucumbers.) Possibly the thick, fuzzy leaf discourages marauders.

Neither have we had any diseased comfrey plants in all that time. In fact, the original specimens have grown into thick, bushy crowns with new offsets which may be used to start fresh plantings or to sell or trade. On the basis of our reading and our own experience, I think it's safe to say that comfrey is highly resistant to pests and to illness.

Harvesting
Bringing in the sheaves of comfrey is a natural hand task that has its own rhythmic satisfaction. When the foliage is 12 to 18 inches tall, we cut the leaves with a sickle by gathering a bunch together and shearing them off two inches above ground. After such a harvest, the plants will grow enough to be cut again in 10 to 30 days. About two weeks is the average in our experience.

At the end of a sunny, non-humid day — when food value in the leaf is at its peak — we sickle our way through the patch. On such occasions, the garden cart becomes our hay wagon to convey the cuttings to their drying spot on the grass. Since comfrey leaves are so high in moisture and protein, we spread them out well to avoid the heating and spoilage that would take place if the foliage were heaped up. Two days of good clear weather does the job, and we pile the result in big cartons and store it in the garage.

One point about laying your crop on grass to dry: You'd best finish harvesting your winter's supply by mid-August, or the heavy dews that appear later in the summer (here in the East, anyhow) will hinder the process. A rack or wire netting screen that holds the drying comfrey up off the ground can considerably extend your "haying" season for the plant.

Comfrey for Self-Sufficiency
Since this article was written, we've found the farm we'd wanted for so long. Living here, we depend more than ever on our goats, rabbits, hens, pigs and—now—sheep. And so, of course, we've laid out another comfrey patch, based on starts we brought from our acre homestead . . . mostly the wide-leaved variety, Bocking No. 4.

pg 4Growing and Using Comfrey Leaves
Grow comfrey for healing scrapes and bruises, activating compost and conditioning soil.
By Nancy Bubel
May/June 1974

inShare

Content Tools
Print
Email
Comments
Related Content
Herbal Remedies for the Elderly: Natural Skin Care That Works
Try making these herbal remedies for aging skin — from a nourishing facial moisturizer to a fragrant...
Making a Basic Balm
This basic balm is generally considered safe for external use, but sage may irritate sensitive skin.
Make Your Own Herbal Teas
Learn how to make different herb teas including: alfalfa mint tea, strawberry ginger tea, cinnamon r...
First-Aid Tips for Gardeners and Farmers
Discover simple, safe and effective remedies for soothing sunburns, blisters, bug bites and other mi...
As we live into our farm, walking the fields, listening to what they want to be, we think more and more of a large plantation of comfrey . . . larger than the one we left behind. Rototiller cultivation and hand harvesting would still be practical, and soil improvement could be carried out gradually on a spot basis. (A shovel of manure and wood ashes for each plant gives us more value from the materials at hand than we'd get from broadcasting the stuff.)

Whatever the scale of your comfrey operation — whether you set out a whole field's worth with a tobacco planter or plant a row beside a city garage — you'll find the plant pays for its keep. Maybe, once you start your experiments with this crop, you'll come up with uses we haven't discovered. If you do, let us know!

SPECIAL NOTE: This article was originally published as "Comfrey for the Homestead" in the May/June 1974 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS. At that time, comfrey had not yet been declared potentially poisonous to humans and animals and this article contained information about using comfrey as a vegetable, in tea and as livestock fodder; none of these applications are advisable, according to FDA and FTC recommendations. Comfrey contains at least 8 pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which can build up in the liver to cause permanent damage and sometimes death. Because of this, comfrey preparations are not sold for oral or internal use in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada or Germany.

For more information about comfrey, its uses and its toxicity to humans and livestock, please consider the following resources.
Cornell University Department of Animal Science: Plants Poisonous to Livestock - Symphytum officinale
University of Maryland Medical Center - Comfrey
The German Commission E
Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs

If you wish to use comfrey for topical applications to aid the healing of bruises and rashes, be certain that you can positively identify the plant. Comfrey is often confused with deadly foxglove and can lead to accidental and fatal poisonings, according to A Field Guide to Venomous Animals and Poisonous Plants by Steven Foster and Roger Caras. If you grow comfrey, you can make your own herbal medicine.

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DesertWillow
7/31/2014 12:28:18 AM
Hera123, I'm not an expert on comfrey. I do grow it and use it for poison ivy rash and feed very small amounts to my rabbits if they are under the weather, since old time rabbit breeders swear it keeps them healthy. I've read a fair amount about the historic uses of comfrey, and it has been used for many hundreds of years at least for skin conditions and wounds. I think that in the case of your dog, the benefits definitely outweigh the risks. If it's working, I would continue until the wound is healed. That's a remarkable improvement in your dog's condition, and I hope it will continue and become a full recovery. I also have Labradors and have a soft spot in my heart for them, so I wish you and your dog all the best. Good Luck!
Hera123
7/6/2014 3:54:46 PM
Hi there, I have a question about comfrey. Hopefully someone would have some feedback for me. Two months ago my 12 yr-old Lab dog developed a huge cancerous aggressive and said incurable growth on the surface skin in her hip area. After a surgery to try to remove the cancerous tumor, the growth came back (it was impossible for the vet to remove all the cancerous cells as they infiltrate in all the surrounding tissues). The growth has gotten bigger now (size of a big canteloup). About 2 weeks ago, it has opened up in one spot of the growth, releasing there the blood vessels that this type of cancer is building up (it tries to build up its own blood vessels inside the growth).There is now a 3"x2" cavity within the growth, which I believe has created some kind of a release point. I decided to take care of the wound/cavity myself. About 6 days ago, in addition to disinfecting, etc. I started to put aloe vera and comfrey's fresh leaves in the cavity. What is interesting is that all the blood vessels that the cancer had built up started to dissolve in this cavity and all that was left was my dog's own tissue. In that cavity there was a hole. Upon examining it with my finger I found out empty spaces inside the mass (like a maze), and no blood in it!...which is I believe a good sign! To this day and despite all this my dog still eats well, and doesn't show sign of pain when I dress the wound. So I am not giving up on her. I am not sure what is dissolving all those blood vessels...comfrey? aloe vera? the energy healing and frequencies that my dog is receiving to correct the cancer imbalance, other herbal supplements I give her to boost her immune system and milk thistle for the liver, but something seems to be working and helping dissolve that mass. Plus the skin around the cavity seems to be healing well. Now, I read just recently then that comfrey should not be taken orally and internally because of damage to the liver and to not apply it to an open wound. But some says that it can be taking internally on a short-term basis. So my question is: Would applying comfrey inside my dog's open wound be considered as taking it internally and dangerous for the liver or else of my dog? Or it is OK on a short-term basis? Sorry for the long message. Any feedback would be appreciated.
krystina
6/19/2014 12:13:34 AM
sferguson72 Try Burdock root it is the best blood purifier try one ounce per 100 lbs. eat raw before flower in salads or dry and make as tea. taste like more sweet version of potato. I've nver eaten cooked but raw has amazing flavor. Seed acts similar to flax with different flavor slightly nutty. does not seem to effect celiacs disease as with flax ;)
sferguson72
6/9/2014 11:06:41 AM
I have heard that comfrey can be used as an alternative medicine for liver disease. I was contaminated with bad blood used in a transfusion in 1975> I now am contaminated with hepititus C. I am seeking to a naural product I can take to cleanse the liver. Comfrey would be easy to grow but I am not convinced this is what I am seeking. Taking an internal alternative would be what I am seeking. Any ideas?
cazzie
4/24/2014 1:11:28 PM
I have used comfrey internally (tea) for many decades. It is a demulcent (soothing to mucous membranes) and an expectorant. It has cured many of us of stomach problems and lung problems. Like any other medicine, it is not to be used long term and with careful thought. It got a bad wrap in the early 70's when a very few folks used it excessively and had bad results. How many people have had horrible side effects and even died from modern day medicines-thousands. I will continue to use it, with wisdom, internally.
Pete Truslow
12/10/2008 11:14:18 AM
Would like to start growing Comfrey for my animals. Can you give me the name of a supplier?
jeremiah_2
11/8/2007 1:32:58 AM
here is a bit I just discovered about comfrey: Subject: Comfrey Safety Answered by: Conrad Richter Question from: Tony Staiano Posted on: March 9, 1999 Is comfrey a safe herb? This is a matter of some controversy. There are a number of studies that suggest that comfrey can cause liver damage and tumours. On the other hand, there are many herbalists who believe that comfrey was the victim of inappropriate over-regulation based on dubious scientific and clinical studies. There is no doubt that comfrey has powerful healing properties. We believe that comfrey should have a role in the treatment of short-term illnesses such as acute ulcers, skin problems, etc. Comfrey should not be taken over a long term. In our opinion, the problem for comfrey began when it was touted as the nuttitional supplement, and zealots advocated its daily consumption for its high protein and vitamin B12 content. People were encouraged to eat leaves or take root or leaf powder daily. Some studies showed that continuous, long term ingestion of comfrey can indeed cause liver damage. But when taken over a short term, as is the traditional usage of comfrey, comfrey, in our opinion, poses little risk to health. In any case, the compounds implicated in liver damage are not absorbed through the skin, and so skin creams and ointments make from comfrey do not pose any risk. Can comfrey when taken, cause dizziness ? We have never heard of this effect. There is nothing in comfrey that suggests how it could cause dizziness.
Hannah_3
6/10/2007 5:15:33 AM
I really appreciate this article. We got our first plant yesterday from a local greenhouse. I'm so excited about being able to use it as part of my goat's feed ration.

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i think you might be talking about oat. but, barley way higher. check it out. and i get my info from Mother Earth News

I would double check the sources used for the comfrey information you posted Dion. I'm still in my preliminary research on it but I've read quite a bit of information that doesn't quite line up with it. People all over the world grow comfrey for their animals oral consumption and many humans also consume it internally (though it has not gotten the green light from the USDA for use on humans here). If it is toxic to the liver I'm pretty sure even having it on your skin would cause damage similar to the way alcohol can cause liver damage even when consumed by means other than consuming it orally (eye shots etc.). I plan to do more research on comfrey before growing it at our home, but that's just my initial two-cents.

Back to your original post though, I don't personally grow fodder but I have a friend who has little systems set up for growing it and uses T5 bulbs with great success. She has a small dairy farm of nubians  and uses it to supplement their feed. She said she has noticed their mineral consumption increase though because they aren't getting the same minerals from the fodder as they do the goat-specific bagged feeds.  I bet youtube would have a lot of helpful information on it as well :)

You Tube has a BUNCH of fodder operation videos for small scale ops. There are some for a few animals up to many head. We had a girl here in N. AZ. that fed pigs, horses, cattle, goats, chickens, turkeys and heaven knows what else . She had a cinder block building that measured about 16X20 that was dedicated to just growing fodder. BUT, then there are folks on You Tube that do it in a bookcase type of thing just for a few animals. Check it out.

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