Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

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My littles doeling, who is about 9 months old is shivering and doesn't want to stand this morning.  It is 8º, but was below zero last night.  I gave them all some grain before we shut them up for the night to help them stay warm.  WHen we fed them, she followed my son to the gate and laid down.  My son picked her up and is holding her, but she won't stop shivering.  I've heard that if we bring her in, then she will have to stay in until the weather changes and I am not set up to do that.

 

We just tried to give her some hot water, but she isn't drinking it.

 

1. Is there anything wrong besides her being cold that I should be aware of?

2. How do I warm her up?

3. Anything else?

 

Thanks,

 

Kare

Tags: goat, shivering

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My first thought is that there is something going on aside from cold, but I don't have enough experience to say what it could be. Also our temperatures are much warmer here. When you stick your finger in her mouth is it cold? If it's warm then she is probably warm. If not best to get her warm. If there is anything wrong besides cold she will be better able to fight it if she's not having to work to heat herself. Deborah made a great suggestion for a sweater on here recently. Good that you tried the hot water. Do you have a heat light? I hope someone with more experience can help soon!

No, I don't have a heat lamp, but I can got get one.  She is finally standing, eating and drinking.  My son held her for about 15 minutes until she stopped shivering.  I will bring her in if I need to, but I really don't want to have a goat in the house the rest of the winter =)  I will check inside her mouth too.

 

Thanks

Glad she is eating and drinking! That is a big help!

Kare at Chaverah Farm said:

No, I don't have a heat lamp, but I can got get one.  She is finally standing, eating and drinking.  My son held her for about 15 minutes until she stopped shivering.  I will bring her in if I need to, but I really don't want to have a goat in the house the rest of the winter =)  I will check inside her mouth too.

 

Thanks

Ditto on everything Adrienne said. We've been having the same temps here, and I'm freezing, but the goats are fine. Is she doing better now? If she was a bottle baby, she'd still probably suck on a bottle, so that's one way to get something warm inside her. They'll usually suck down an ounce of water before they realize it's not milk and spit out the nipple.
The sun is very warm and it's up to a balmy 19º   She is up and around with the others now.  She is the smallest even though my other doeling is a month older.  We had 18 below last week and she didn't react this way, so that is why it concerned me.  But she seems fine.  Her mouth is warm.  I don't have a bottle... I guess I need to get one. =)  

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:
Ditto on everything Adrienne said. We've been having the same temps here, and I'm freezing, but the goats are fine. Is she doing better now? If she was a bottle baby, she'd still probably suck on a bottle, so that's one way to get something warm inside her. They'll usually suck down an ounce of water before they realize it's not milk and spit out the nipple.
wow, 19? It's still 9 here. Yes, I'd be concerned too if one were shivering, because they should be able to tolerate the cold. If she wasn't a bottle baby, she'll probably act like you're trying to kill her. So, one advantage of bottle babies is that most of them will suck on anything -- usually makes it easy to give them medicine too. I'd just keep an eye on her for now and hope she doesn't start shivering again. Maybe it was just a fluke.

Kare at Chaverah Farm said:
The sun is very warm and it's up to a balmy 19º   She is up and around with the others now.  She is the smallest even though my other doeling is a month older.  We had 18 below last week and she didn't react this way, so that is why it concerned me.  But she seems fine.  Her mouth is warm.  I don't have a bottle... I guess I need to get one. =)  

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:
Ditto on everything Adrienne said. We've been having the same temps here, and I'm freezing, but the goats are fine. Is she doing better now? If she was a bottle baby, she'd still probably suck on a bottle, so that's one way to get something warm inside her. They'll usually suck down an ounce of water before they realize it's not milk and spit out the nipple.

My goat room is only 12x11  but I have 2 heatlamps in there.  One pointed straight at the hay bale they lay on and the other "towards" the bale by way of hitting the loose minerals so they dont stay damp from the Oregon weather -(

It is only getting down to bout 30 here at night presently - and during the day yesterday, with a thick coat she was lying under that light. 

 

With no heat lamp at that temp surely she is freezing cold.... burrrr....  goats are probably like us, some  get colder than others.  My barn is 2 story and bout 100 years old, oak boards spaced bout 1/4" apart.  I had draped some plastic sheeting above their immediate haybales - but with kids coming, yesterday I draped some housewrap (had that in the barn, didnt have to spend any $$) over the top of their room to try to keep some heat in.

this Siberian winter you guys are having is sure tough on livestock!!

I wonder if maybe she is not getting enough to eat?  I always left hay out free choice with my previous herd, so giving them some in the morning and some around 5pm leaves me questioning myself...  For a 19" doe, a 21" doe, and two under a year we are giving 2 flakes a day according to what the previous owner told me.  Does that sound like enough?

 

Also, this little one, Sissy, is the smallest, maybe she is pushed away from the food and doesn't get her share.  I will have to keep an eye on that.  My daughter just came in and said Sissy is the one that is picked on the most.  She stood there the whole time and made sure everyone got to eat.  I have done that before too, but I'm hoping they will figure out the pecking order???  How do you stop the herd leader from hogging all the food?  

Tell me about it! =)

Melissa Johnson said:
this Siberian winter you guys are having is sure tough on livestock!!
My desire is that my goats will be hardy enough to withstand the winter no matter the temperatures, especially since they have an enclosed barn and each other's body heat.  My last goats were in a 3 sided shelter outside and they were fine.  Even my bucks were fine, although on the below zero nights I put a doe in with them.  (risky, I know =>)  For kids I will use a heat lamp, but I don't want to get my does used to it.  Am I thinking correctly on this?

Melissa Johnson said:

My goat room is only 12x11  but I have 2 heatlamps in there.  One pointed straight at the hay bale they lay on and the other "towards" the bale by way of hitting the loose minerals so they dont stay damp from the Oregon weather -(

It is only getting down to bout 30 here at night presently - and during the day yesterday, with a thick coat she was lying under that light. 

 

With no heat lamp at that temp surely she is freezing cold.... burrrr....  goats are probably like us, some  get colder than others.  My barn is 2 story and bout 100 years old, oak boards spaced bout 1/4" apart.  I had draped some plastic sheeting above their immediate haybales - but with kids coming, yesterday I draped some housewrap (had that in the barn, didnt have to spend any $$) over the top of their room to try to keep some heat in.

Yes. I turn off the heat lamp as soon as I can -- usually within a few days, even if it's around zero. The kids fatten up really quickly. If the temps are just around freezing, the heat lamp goes off within a few hours -- basically when they're fully dry.

Kare at Chaverah Farm said:
My desire is that my goats will be hardy enough to withstand the winter no matter the temperatures, especially since they have an enclosed barn and each other's body heat.  My last goats were in a 3 sided shelter outside and they were fine.  Even my bucks were fine, although on the below zero nights I put a doe in with them.  (risky, I know =>)  For kids I will use a heat lamp, but I don't want to get my does used to it.  Am I thinking correctly on this?

Melissa Johnson said:

My goat room is only 12x11  but I have 2 heatlamps in there.  One pointed straight at the hay bale they lay on and the other "towards" the bale by way of hitting the loose minerals so they dont stay damp from the Oregon weather -(

It is only getting down to bout 30 here at night presently - and during the day yesterday, with a thick coat she was lying under that light. 

 

With no heat lamp at that temp surely she is freezing cold.... burrrr....  goats are probably like us, some  get colder than others.  My barn is 2 story and bout 100 years old, oak boards spaced bout 1/4" apart.  I had draped some plastic sheeting above their immediate haybales - but with kids coming, yesterday I draped some housewrap (had that in the barn, didnt have to spend any $$) over the top of their room to try to keep some heat in.

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