Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

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Orange spots (pee?) in the snow in goats pen?  any idea what it could be? I give molasses and apple cider vinegar in warm water.  I just added sweet feed to their goat chow 50/50 with sunflower seeds (could this do it?) They have loose minerals available and I give them pine tree forage in their pen:) any ideas?

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Not sure about orange. If it's dark yellow, it could be that the urine is really concentrated because they're not drinking enough water. How much molasses and vinegar are you putting in there? Maybe they don't like it? I'd suggesting not putting anything in their water for two or three days and see if their water consumption increases and if the color changes back to light yellow or clear.

I've never heard of a goat with a bladder infection, but if you think it looks like blood, you might ask the vet about it. Bloody urine in a dog or cat generally means a urinary tract infection.

Kind of off topic, but be sure your molasses is unsulfured. Sulfur will inhibit mineral absorption... I learned this while researching Blackstrap Molasses. Good stuff, but only if you buy the right kind...

@ Deborah: Thankyou:D  I was hoping it was just a common thing, but am glad for the advice so I can help them:)  I usually put a tablespoon of molasses and two teaspoons of apple cider vinegar in three gallons of water -- I will stop for a while and see if that helps.  I dont think it is blood, but I could be wrong... their loose minerals are orange/rusty colored, Ithought that might be it but if no one else has had it happen I am sure that is not it.  I will contact our vet too; now that I know you are concerned:)  It is now painfully obvious I have allot to learn!

@ Rachel: thankyou I had no idea! how do you tell? would it say on the jar?

Mine is bulk, that I got from the health food store... and it says unsulfured on the container. Sulfur is used pretty commonly in molasses as a preserving agent from what I understand... so I think it's safe to assume that unless your bottle says it's NOT sulfured, that it is.

my goats never drink as much water as I would like to see.  I do notice that if they have been getting apple cidar vinegar in their water - they will get tired of it.  I switch to plain warm water and they drink substantially more. I think they get tired of the same thing just like us.  Someone told me they supply both - that way if one likes vinegared water better - they have it - one likes plain water better - it is available also. ^^

I read 1/2 oz. acv to 1 gallon water.... ??

I happened upon this http://www.jackmauldin.com/health/copper_deficiency.htm article while researching something else. I have NO idea how reliable this site may or may not be. The part of the article relevant to this discussion is the claim that red/rust colored urine could be a sign of copper toxicity. And I have no idea why the hyperlink decided to insert where it did...

I have looked at the Tennessee Meat Goat site many times - it indicates that the author of that article writes for that site?  Something like that - anyway, I wonder if a simple blood test could determine copper level? But it seems I remember reading the only way to determine that is examining the liver - which would mean necropsy - know I misspelled that!  Someone else here would know about that for sure.

Jackie K said:

I happened upon this http://www.jackmauldin.com/health/copper_deficiency.htm article while researching something else. I have NO idea how reliable this site may or may not be. The part of the article relevant to this discussion is the claim that red/rust colored urine could be a sign of copper toxicity. And I have no idea why the hyperlink decided to insert where it did...

I'm under the impression that copper levels can only be measured in liver necropsy...?

Yeah and once you do a liver necropsy the possible copper toxicity becomes a moot point....

Correct, there is no blood test. There is supposedly a hair test, but every vet that's ever mentioned it quickly followed up with "it's not very reliable." I've heard that they can do a liver biopsy, but after hearing a pathologist talk about how much of the liver they need, I'm amazed that it has ever been done on a live goat. For practical purposes, a necropsy is the only reliable test for copper. That is one advantage of butchering a wether or two every year -- you can send in the liver for testing. It is just one goat, but it's better than nothing.

Well, for that goat it would... but it might help you decide whether your heard feeding management should change.

Jackie K said:

Yeah and once you do a liver necropsy the possible copper toxicity becomes a moot point....

Just to add to the colour pee and not sure if this will be the same as our horses but with our mares in winter their pee leaves orange, brownish colouring in the snow.  You will not see this with geldings or stallions.  With horses it is the oxidization that causes this!  It happens all year round but you don't actually see the colour change in summer as it is hitting grass but in winter because of the snow you do.  It might be the same thing for the goats.  Only a thought! In horses it's nothing to worry about!

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