Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Is anyone on this forum using Oil of Orgena as a dewormer?  Would love to know if its a good alternative, or perhaps supplement to chemical wormers.

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2 months... And I asked you a question on another thread about poisonous plants if you get a chance...  http://nigeriandwarfgoats.ning.com/forum/topics/safe-woodland-brows...

Thanks again for your help!

If this person seriously puts kids on de-methox at birth, she knows nothing about the disease or the drug. The life cycle of coccidia is three weeks, so she's wasting her money for the first three weeks. If a kid gets diarrhea before three weeks, it's from something else. I've never heard of anyone putting a kid on a coccidia preventative any earlier than three weeks. And the more common practice is to do preventative for two weeks a couple of different times at the most, like two to four weeks of age and then at 8 to 10 weeks or something like that. Apparently this person subscribes to the "if a little is good, more is better" philosophy, which is just wrong. Goats will have coccidia in their system, and they need to develop resistance to it. So, you are not doing them any favors by keeping them on medication all the time. It's like putting someone on antibiotics all the time. The sooner the kid is off the di-methox, the better. If the kid has zero or a very small load of coccidia in her system when she arrives at your place, you probably won't see a problem any sooner than 3-4 weeks, and if she picks up coccidia from your goats, they should still be treatable with a sulfa drug (hopefully).

OK, Thanks, I know very little as these are my very first goats, but I like to question... well... Everything. Thanks for the advice! I'm hoping it will go well even with a rough start! And I can't guarantee that she started before 3 weeks, just the way she explained it to me seemed like she had done it from very early on... So, perhaps she's waited. But I don't know. Maybe I should know more, but like I said, it's my first set of goats, so I'm still obviously learning.. A lot. Thanks again! Planning to purchase the book now :)

The feed with medication I use has Descoquinate.  I have been doing this with breeding and babies for 5 years and have not issues or problems and healthy goats, never had a disease. As a note:  Every person and breeder does things their own way and there is no right or wrong unless there is gross misconduct or neglect.  I have found through personal experience on several forums you can get 20 different answers to a problem even with a video, you can get a different vets and people saying different things.  :-(

Yeah, that's what is driving me a bit nutty... Guess we'll do what I see as essential and be ready to figure things out and do what is necessary. Thanks for all your help! It at least makes me not feel like a horrible person for not wanting to do the meds that the previous owner is recommending! 

If you are milking your goats for human consumption, you are not supposed to feed them a medicated feed because it gets in the milk. No one knows what it will do to you, but most of us have dairy animals so that we can have drug-free milk, so giving drugs to a milk goat kind of defeats the purpose. But if your goats are just pets, and you're not drinking their milk, then it's not a big deal.

One reason I wrote Raising Goats Naturally was to weed through facts versus opinions and to help people understand why they hear conflicting information. In the past, everyone who wrote goat books had only their own experience to go on, which is great on their farm. But I've been online since I got my first goats in 2002, so I learned pretty quickly that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to raising goats. You have to know the facts about goats, meds, etc in order to figure out how to best raise goats on your farm. I know people four miles from me who would be raising their goats totally differently than I do (if they had goats) because they don't have sulfur in their well water like we do, so that changes the whole nutritional game. So, you can either copy someone's management and hope it works for you and then continually make random adjustments until you figure out how to make it work -- or you can learn all of the facts (what goats need, symptoms of problems) and then figure out a management plan for your farm. And like I said in another post a few minutes ago -- they've only really started researching goats in the last 10 years, and unfortunately there is still a ton of old info floating around online.

Just relax, observe and love them...they will be fine.  Great that you're doing research  :-)

Thanks to you both :) 

You're welcome  :-)  Have fun!

Diatomaceous earth seems fine....until it isn't. I got my first pair of goats from a breeder who uses DE for worming. A few weeks later I had to rush the buck to the vets because Dusty was very off his feed and lethargic. The vet told me that diamaceous earth is NOT a wormer. I went to Ivermec and use that regularly now. Unfortunately, Dusty had been so riddled with worms (as was Molly, the other goat I purchased at the time) that he was never really healthy and we lost him shortly after the hurricane last year.

Trish said:

I just use DE  -- Diatomaceous Earth, it's great!

While research has not shown that DE is a good dewormer, current research for the past ten years has repeatedly shown that regularly using using any chemical dewormers is a losing strategy because parasites become resistant to it. Since there are only three classes of dewormer in the US, you can wind up having NO dewormer that works on your farm. We wound up with worms resistant to Ivomec (ivermectin) ten years ago. So when you say you are using it regularly, I do hope that you are not deworming on a schedule and just mean that it's the dewormer that you use ONLY when it is necessary. If Dusty died from parasites in spite of you using ivermectin, then it sounds like you have a problem with resistance already. When a dewormer works, goats don't die. Here is more on that topic: 

https://thriftyhomesteader.com/dewormer-resistance-in-goats/ 

Darleen Somley said:

Diatomaceous earth seems fine....until it isn't. I got my first pair of goats from a breeder who uses DE for worming. A few weeks later I had to rush the buck to the vets because Dusty was very off his feed and lethargic. The vet told me that diamaceous earth is NOT a wormer. I went to Ivermec and use that regularly now. Unfortunately, Dusty had been so riddled with worms (as was Molly, the other goat I purchased at the time) that he was never really healthy and we lost him shortly after the hurricane last year.

Trish said:

I just use DE  -- Diatomaceous Earth, it's great!

Dusty died because the breeder used DE. He was infested when I got him. Ivermec cleared up the worms but the damage was done and he never fully recovered. My vet recommended monthly worming with Ivermec and never expect DE to do the job. 

Just my experience with diamatious earth.

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