Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

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Is anyone on this forum using Oil of Orgena as a dewormer?  Would love to know if its a good alternative, or perhaps supplement to chemical wormers.

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I haven't, but I'd love to learn more about it! I have oregano essential oil in the oil concoction along with peppermint essential oil that I use when a doe has a high SCC. I've also fed large quantities of dried oregano to a doe with mastitis. I'm always on the lookout for more natural healing ideas. Do you have specific dosage and usage info?

I know it's a good treatment for coccidia, at least in chickens, but I don't know for sure about other parasites.

I just use DE  -- Diatomaceous Earth, it's great!

I just read about using oregano oil for getting rid of parasites in humans, and was wondering about using it in animals as well.  For people I read to use 2 or 3 drops in water and drink three times a day.  I didn't see anywhere how long to do it.

How much do you give to your goats? I've read conflicting info on it and many say that it hasn't helped them at all... Just curious! :) 

Trish said:

I just use DE  -- Diatomaceous Earth, it's great!

I just sprinkle on a little every time I feed in the warm weather (scientific studies actually do show that DE does NOT work LOL)  ...and I don't feed grain etc every single day.  I believe a scientific article I once read, that when the goats browse, 1) that is their nutrition and they don't need supplements, and 2) goats know "which" weeds and browse to eat that counter worms and act as a natural dewormer.  I have been raising goats for 5 years and they browse and I have never had to deworm with dewormers and and they are tight, fit and healhty. The people I see giving dewormers all the time and CD&T and antibiotics that destroy the bacteria in the rueman are the ones that have problems and their goats don't look healthy.  Not saying not to give them chemicals and such, but people over do it.  Just my opinion.

I was basically thinking that myself- about the synthetic dewormers and such. We do natural stuff for everything here and that has worked out really well for us. I am buying an herbal dewormer that I'm going to try, by molly's herbals, but our goats won't have acres to run and forage on, so parasites may be more of a problem for me. Guess we'll see. Do you use anything for coccidia? That's the only one I feel unsure about, I'm getting a young doe and the lady I'm buying from says to give it di-methox 40% until 6months, and I am afraid that may get me off to a bad start but I don't want to be overrun with it either and put myself in a bad place by not doing it... Any info? Thanks for the reply!

Trish said:

I just sprinkle on a little every time I feed in the warm weather (scientific studies actually do show that DE does NOT work LOL)  ...and I don't feed grain etc every single day.  I believe a scientific article I once read, that when the goats browse, 1) that is their nutrition and they don't need supplements, and 2) goats know "which" weeds and browse to eat that counter worms and act as a natural dewormer.  I have been raising goats for 5 years and they browse and I have never had to deworm with dewormers and and they are tight, fit and healhty. The people I see giving dewormers all the time and CD&T and antibiotics that destroy the bacteria in the rueman are the ones that have problems and their goats don't look healthy.  Not saying not to give them chemicals and such, but people over do it.  Just my opinion.

The only concern with Cocci is the babies.  When the moms are pregnant, I feed them a medicated feed for cocci and the babies until they are two months.  Then I don't worry about it.  It also makes me wonder why goats need CD&T shots every year, when the tetnus (T in CD&T) is good for 10 years in humans...LOL no one has been able to answer that one.

I guess I don't worry about all the stuff I see people posting on these sites. Common sense dictates all. If ones goats aren't worm loaded, why deworm them?  Doing fecals helps a lot.  If they need copper or to be dewormed, you will surley see the symptoms in how they look.  Anemia for one can be an indicator for worms...

There is huge variation in worm problems based upon where someone lives and what they have for pasture and browse, or if they use a dry lot. The parasite section in Raising Goats Naturally is 24 pages, and I can't summarize that easily here. Trish lives in New Mexico where worms are not much of a problem for most people, so odds are good that even if she didn't use DE, she still wouldn't have a problem. We actually didn't have a problem on our farm for the first two years, and we used nothing, so I thought that everyone was wasting their money on dewormers. But then I overstocked my pasture and brought in a goat with a parasite problem, and I had goats dying. We wound up with dewormer resistance, and DE did not work, nor did any of the three herbal remedies we bought, including Molly's. I had a buck die when I was using Molly's, and I was using 2X her recommended amount and doing fecals, and the worm load was not going down at all. There is a scientific study where they had two groups of goats to compare using Molly's versus nothing, and there was no significant difference between the group that used Molly's and the group that used nothing. 

Preventing infection is the best thing to do, and here is an excerpt from my book on that topic:

http://www.homegrownandhandmadethebook.com/2015/04/internal-parasit...

It explains a lot about pasture rotation and other means of naturally keeping goats healthy. 

There are natural things that have been proven to help, such as copper oxide wire particles and lespedeza servicea.

Forgot about your coccidia question ... I would definitely NOT give di-methox for preventative for even two weeks and definitely NOT for months! By doing that, you are creating drug-resistant coccidia, and when a goat does get an overload, you will have to resort to Corid, which is not as safe, or a horse drug, which is WAY off-label for using with goats. If you have a situation where coccidiosis is a constant problem, you can use medicated feed because that has a different mode of action, so if you wind up with coccidiosis, the sulfa drugs will still work. But bottom line on coccidiosis is that if you have well-fed kids -- and I'm talking about milk, not any type of goat feed -- and you have a "clean" barn without visible poop laying around where kids can mouth it, then you should not have any problems with coccidiosis other than weaned bucklings, which may get it due to the stress of weaning plus the sudden lack of milk with all of its awesome antibodies.

Ok, great info, thank you to both! But, Deborah, what do I do if the person I'm buying from has already been doing the di-methox for the last 2 months....? And the baby was not drinking mom's milk after a few weeks, as far as I know...?? Wait till there is a definite problem and then try the feed and go from there? Start on the medicated feed? :/

If she's been on di-methox for the last two months, she shouldn't have any coccidia, so hopefully she'll be fine when she comes to your place. How old is the kid?

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