Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

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I was shocked to see this on my doeling. Her dam was born here and she is 5th generation on my farm. Her sire was also born here and he is 3rd generation. 

No issues with teats from any that Ive bred. I have plenty of relatives and never an inkling that double teat would occur.

She has a full brother that is fine. Should he be wethered since his sister has it?

These are unregistered but her dam is one of my best milkers. 

Thanks!!

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Teat defects can hide for generations. But I'm convinced that copper (or maybe selenium) deficiency can bring them out. The first few years we had goats, we had teat defects EVERY year! We also had severe copper deficiency and borderline selenium deficiency. Once the nutritional deficiencies were eliminated, the teat defects disappeared.

In the last 14  years or so, we have only had one teat defect, and her great great great grandmother Star was a goat that threw more teat defects than any other goat. In fact, Star's son jumped the fence and bred her, and she had quads with two or three of them having teat defects. Her registration number was 1000-something, so some of her grandparents were committee-registered meaning that we have no idea what was in her pedigree beyond that. She was my best milker in the early years and had the best teats. She is also the matriarch of  my absolute favorite line of milkers. They have the rare combination of excellent parasite resistance AND excellent production. 

There is a goat in your doeling's background that was not registered most likely because she had a teat defect. It's not surprising to see things like this popping up in unregistered goats. I always say that no one is going to sell a goat for $50 or $100 if they could get several hundred for them. And reputable breeders know that a teat defect is a DQ, so they aren't going to sell a goat with a teat defect with papers because they don't want their herd name associated with it. Unregistered goats are like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get.

A teat defect is really not a big deal in the grand scheme of things. But you don't know how functional the extra teats are. She will make a wonderful pet for someone. Just make sure they know that she shouldn't be bred. She might be okay, but why risk it. 

I would wether the brother and NOT repeat the breeding between the parents. And I wouldn't breed that buck to any does that are related to the doeling's dam just to be safe in case they're also carrying a gene for extra teats. If you just look at the meat goat world, it's obvious that they are genetic because when you don't select against them, you see them like crazy! I also used to see them in my Shetland sheep and even in one of my Irish dexter cows. Again, none of those breeders care about extra teats because they are not dairy animals. Teat defects can make milking difficult by hand or even impossible with a machine, depending on where the extra teat is or if it's a fishtail teat.

The buck has already sold and none of his other kids from my breeding or other breedings have the defect. The new buck owner was going to buy this dam but we cancelled that to prevent it from appearing again. This is the dams 2nd freshening. Should she be bred again to different buck or sold as a pet? I love her udders!! 

Thanks for all that info too. I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out what/how this happened.

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Teat defects can hide for generations. But I'm convinced that copper (or maybe selenium) deficiency can bring them out. The first few years we had goats, we had teat defects EVERY year! We also had severe copper deficiency and borderline selenium deficiency. Once the nutritional deficiencies were eliminated, the teat defects disappeared.

In the last 14  years or so, we have only had one teat defect, and her great great great grandmother Star was a goat that threw more teat defects than any other goat. In fact, Star's son jumped the fence and bred her, and she had quads with two or three of them having teat defects. Her registration number was 1000-something, so some of her grandparents were committee-registered meaning that we have no idea what was in her pedigree beyond that. She was my best milker in the early years and had the best teats. She is also the matriarch of  my absolute favorite line of milkers. They have the rare combination of excellent parasite resistance AND excellent production. 

There is a goat in your doeling's background that was not registered most likely because she had a teat defect. It's not surprising to see things like this popping up in unregistered goats. I always say that no one is going to sell a goat for $50 or $100 if they could get several hundred for them. And reputable breeders know that a teat defect is a DQ, so they aren't going to sell a goat with a teat defect with papers because they don't want their herd name associated with it. Unregistered goats are like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get.

A teat defect is really not a big deal in the grand scheme of things. But you don't know how functional the extra teats are. She will make a wonderful pet for someone. Just make sure they know that she shouldn't be bred. She might be okay, but why risk it. 

I would wether the brother and NOT repeat the breeding between the parents. And I wouldn't breed that buck to any does that are related to the doeling's dam just to be safe in case they're also carrying a gene for extra teats. If you just look at the meat goat world, it's obvious that they are genetic because when you don't select against them, you see them like crazy! I also used to see them in my Shetland sheep and even in one of my Irish dexter cows. Again, none of those breeders care about extra teats because they are not dairy animals. Teat defects can make milking difficult by hand or even impossible with a machine, depending on where the extra teat is or if it's a fishtail teat.

Hopefully if she is bred to different bucks you won't see any more teat defects from her. The genetics for teat defects in dairy goats is pretty rare since people breed against that. 

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