Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Hello,

My name is David and we just moved to NW Washington state a year ago from Utah.  As part of the move we wanted out of the suburbs and into the country for some land.  We got a little over an acre to have us a small homestead.

Our plans so far are that we have 7 - 12 chickens, we currently have 7 and they are doing great.  We also wanted to have some ND Goats.  I work from home except for the occasional times I have to travel out of town for a few days so for our goats we decided to go with wethers as we are really wanting them for pets and not Meat or Milk.  Unfortunately since I can't always be here we opted to not go with milking.  4 are getting 4 of them this saturday, so excited!

Our housing currently includes a 8 X 12 chicken coop and a 12 X 14 goat stall.  Completely enclosed to keep them warm and dry.  We will be adding a second padlock down the road for goats as we got the recommendation from the goat sellers that we should have a backup.  

The goats and chickens also share a 30000 sw ft pasture which I plan on using the poly electric tape as our dividers so we can do rotational grazing and be flexible.  The pasture is enclosed by no climb 2 X4 horse fencing with exterior electrical fence of 6 strand to help deter predators in this area.  

Views: 69

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Welcome to the group and the world of goat ownership! 

Wow! You have the Ft. Knox of perimeter fencing there. I can't imagine any predator going over that fence. If you put up more perimeter fence, two strands of electric is plenty -- one at the bottom to stop an animal that tries to dig under and then one near the top for an animal that tries to climb over. 

Single strand electric or poly tape don't work well for Nigerians unless you have the strands really close together -- like six inches apart and six inches off the ground because they will go under or between strands, if it's even remotely possible. 

Hopefully the goats can't access the chicken coop. They LOVE grain and can make themselves sick because they will overeat.

I was going for Ft. Knox lol.  I was new to the fencing so I went off the guide that 6 inches accounts for all sorts of animals, but your right I went overboard but gotta keep the kiddos safe.

I was thinking on the poly tape to keep goats, chickens away from the fence line so they don't dig under and two for rotational grazing.  given I have the fence staked down do you think that's overkill.  Any other suggestions to keep them from digging under the fence line as much as possible.  

good call on the chicken coop, didn't even think about that so I will come up with something.  Loving this place already.

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Welcome to the group and the world of goat ownership! 

Wow! You have the Ft. Knox of perimeter fencing there. I can't imagine any predator going over that fence. If you put up more perimeter fence, two strands of electric is plenty -- one at the bottom to stop an animal that tries to dig under and then one near the top for an animal that tries to climb over. 

Single strand electric or poly tape don't work well for Nigerians unless you have the strands really close together -- like six inches apart and six inches off the ground because they will go under or between strands, if it's even remotely possible. 

Hopefully the goats can't access the chicken coop. They LOVE grain and can make themselves sick because they will overeat.

Goats do not dig, and neither do chickens. A goat may paw at the ground a couple of times before laying down, but that's it. Chickens scratch when looking for bugs and worms. 

For rotational grazing with goats, the best option for subdividing pastures is to use ElectroNet made and sold by Premier1Supplies online. Trying to use polytape for rotational grazing would take you HOURS to put up and take down when rotating. Single strand electric is meant to be for permanent fencing. You would need about six strands, six inches apart, so you'd be walking around the perimeter of the area six times versus one time with netting. And the netting has its own stakes that are very easy to put down. 

Thank you - that's what i was reading about last night is the ElectroNet.  I'll be getting some of that so I can subdivide and rotate.  Thank you for the clarification on digging, with all the post out there it's hard to know what is fact versus not and several post referenced goats will dig to escape the fence.

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Goats do not dig, and neither do chickens. A goat may paw at the ground a couple of times before laying down, but that's it. Chickens scratch when looking for bugs and worms. 

For rotational grazing with goats, the best option for subdividing pastures is to use ElectroNet made and sold by Premier1Supplies online. Trying to use polytape for rotational grazing would take you HOURS to put up and take down when rotating. Single strand electric is meant to be for permanent fencing. You would need about six strands, six inches apart, so you'd be walking around the perimeter of the area six times versus one time with netting. And the netting has its own stakes that are very easy to put down. 

hi

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Books written by Deborah Niemann

Order this book on Kindle!

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Need goat equipment?

Yogurt Maker

2-quart milk pail


Mineral feeder (put minerals in one side and baking soda in the other!)

© 2021   Created by Deborah Niemann-Boehle.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service