Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Anyone with knowledge on this stuff?  I am def. going to deworm my goats.  I checked them against my FAMACHA printout this AM and not one of them was in the top two colors.  That info plus the fact that I don't like the looks of the buckling and my lactating doe was the palest of all, I think I should definitely do it.  I am hoping to hear back from their breeder before I buy a dewormer though I know she won't tell me of one they are resistant to because she said they are not resistant to any.

 

 

so....do they need to have an injectible?  Or can I give them an oral syringe like a horse?  I don't feel comfortable sticking them, I'd wait for hubby to do it tomorrow.  He is an RN & much more comfortable with needles than me!  

 

The Manna Pro stuff seemed nice since it has all that extra vitamins and nutrients to build them back up & I see it also contains ammonium chloride so I could probably give some to my wether without a problem.

 

Thoughts?

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By the way...I read some older posts about worming...

 

I see people recommending to only give the injectable wormers orally.  I just read an article stating that an oral dose of an injectible could cause the parasites to all die and let go at once, and the goat could bleed out and die.  If it were injected, the die off would be slower.

 

Can anyone comment on the contradiction?

And what is this one?  It does not list an active ingredient.  But it says there is no milk withdrawal period?  Tractor Supply lists this

 

IVESCO GOAT DEWORMER CONCENTRATE, 1 LBS.

I have never heard of a goat dieing from giving a dewormer orally. In fact, I've heard just the opposite. I posted on another thread yesterday a quote from a goat textbook for vets, Goat Science and Production (2010), and she says oral is the preferred method of deworming goats.

Juliana Goodwin said:

By the way...I read some older posts about worming...

 

I see people recommending to only give the injectable wormers orally.  I just read an article stating that an oral dose of an injectible could cause the parasites to all die and let go at once, and the goat could bleed out and die.  If it were injected, the die off would be slower.

 

Can anyone comment on the contradiction?

The only thing I don't like about Positive Pellet is that some goats won't eat it, but if there are several goats, they have this competition thing going on, so it's usually not a problem if you give it to all of them at once. The only possible problem then is that they might not get enough, so I usually give them about 20% more than they need.
I wouldn't use a dewormer that doesn't list the active ingredient on the label. I honestly would have thought it was illegal for them to NOT list an active ingredient.

Juliana Goodwin said:

And what is this one?  It does not list an active ingredient.  But it says there is no milk withdrawal period?  Tractor Supply lists this

 

IVESCO GOAT DEWORMER CONCENTRATE, 1 LBS.

Deborah,

 

It probably does say on the label...I was looking at the website for TSC and it didn't say on the little blurb for the product.  Which is still surprising, but..

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

I wouldn't use a dewormer that doesn't list the active ingredient on the label. I honestly would have thought it was illegal for them to NOT list an active ingredient.

Juliana Goodwin said:

And what is this one?  It does not list an active ingredient.  But it says there is no milk withdrawal period?  Tractor Supply lists this

 

IVESCO GOAT DEWORMER CONCENTRATE, 1 LBS.

http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/614728-goat_wormer_concentrate...

This site says the active ingredient is morantel tartrate (Rumatel)

That's the same thing that's in Positive Pellet.

Rachel Whetzel said:

http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/614728-goat_wormer_concentrate...

This site says the active ingredient is morantel tartrate (Rumatel)

Okay, well I picked up the Positive Pellet because it was one of only two that my closest feed store sells and I am quite sick today.  I thought this will be good enough for now as I just don't feel up to making the drive the TSC after being the vet for an hour with one of my dogs...

 

The other one this store sells was a pelleted Safeguard for all species.  But I sat there and read the label and there was no specific dosing instruction for goats and I thought, i'll get this home and never be able to figure out how to use it.  So I bought the Positive Pellet instead.  If they won't eat it or whatever, then I'll make the drive to TSC.... or maybe hubby can help out tomorrow if I am still so sick.

 

Sidenote, this vet said she will perform the fecal egg counts for 20 bucks per goat.  I thought I might bring her my doe's poop a few days post worming.  Doe is the palest.  So if her fecal is acceptable after worming then I could assume we are out of the woods. I can't afford to have them all done right now.  Or it's that or the chicken fencing which they really need......sigh.

 



Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

That's the same thing that's in Positive Pellet.

Rachel Whetzel said:

http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/614728-goat_wormer_concentrate...

This site says the active ingredient is morantel tartrate (Rumatel)

Also, how soon after worming should I expect an improvement of eyelid color?  

 

Besides a fecal, if I saw no improvement in eyelid color after a certain amount of time could I try a different dewormer?

 

Is it true that chickens are dead end hosts for goat parasites?  Would it help with reinfection if I were to put the chicken flock on the goat pasture with them?  If I could get the damn chickens in there it would also eliminate the need for their own fenced grazing area but they don't herd very well!  But the day we tried it was very hot and we had to stop because I was worried we were working up the chickens too much in the heat.  Maybe I will try again tomorrow morning when it's cool...

Juliana Goodwin said:

Okay, well I picked up the Positive Pellet because it was one of only two that my closest feed store sells and I am quite sick today.  I thought this will be good enough for now as I just don't feel up to making the drive the TSC after being the vet for an hour with one of my dogs...

 

The other one this store sells was a pelleted Safeguard for all species.  But I sat there and read the label and there was no specific dosing instruction for goats and I thought, i'll get this home and never be able to figure out how to use it.  So I bought the Positive Pellet instead.  If they won't eat it or whatever, then I'll make the drive to TSC.... or maybe hubby can help out tomorrow if I am still so sick.

 

Sidenote, this vet said she will perform the fecal egg counts for 20 bucks per goat.  I thought I might bring her my doe's poop a few days post worming.  Doe is the palest.  So if her fecal is acceptable after worming then I could assume we are out of the woods. I can't afford to have them all done right now.  Or it's that or the chicken fencing which they really need......sigh.

 



Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

That's the same thing that's in Positive Pellet.

Rachel Whetzel said:

http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/614728-goat_wormer_concentrate...

This site says the active ingredient is morantel tartrate (Rumatel)

Depending upon how pale the eyelids are, you'll see an improvement within a few days (if you're starting at pure white) to a week or ten days (if they're not that anemic). If you don't see an improvement by then, you could try a different dewormer and mark the other one off your list.

We let our goats graze in the same area as our chickens sometimes. The only possible problem is that you don't want the goats to be able to get into the chicken feed because they'll eat grain until they get diarrhea, which is no fun.

Right, my chickens only get their feed in their coop.  Normally they free range with access tot heir coop.  But I think they'd do fine in the pasture for a couple of hours with no feed.  I'd think they'd be more inspired to hunt for bugs if there was no free meal lol.

 

Last...would molasses or honey help if they don't like the pellets?  We are going to try it tonite.

 

And it clearly says on the package that there is no milk throwaway time.  Does that mean we can still drink it?

Deborah Niemann-Boehle said:

Depending upon how pale the eyelids are, you'll see an improvement within a few days (if you're starting at pure white) to a week or ten days (if they're not that anemic). If you don't see an improvement by then, you could try a different dewormer and mark the other one off your list.

We let our goats graze in the same area as our chickens sometimes. The only possible problem is that you don't want the goats to be able to get into the chicken feed because they'll eat grain until they get diarrhea, which is no fun.

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