Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

So I've been reading on this site for 2 years and have learned SO much. But again I made a mistake and learned the hard way. I have a 2nd freshener who started showing at 2 months and I was SURE she was having triplets or quads (she had triplets last year). So, fearing pregnancy toxemia (after reading way too many horror stories about it), I decided (against the advice of Deborah and others on here) to feed my doe grain in her last month. I started slow and increased the grain until she was getting about 1 and a 1/2 cups twice a day at the last. She was enormous. Well, she had TWINS 3 days ago and one was 4 lbs 10 oz and the other was 4 lbs 6 oz!!! The fist one came out with head and ONE leg and she was fairly stuck because of her size but I manage to get her out while mama screamed bloody murder. The buckling was easier as he was diving. They are both beautiful and healthy. Never again. I will NOT feed my does grain in pregnancy again except maybe in the last week and not much. 

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Congratulations! They're beautiful! Glad everyone is doing well. {hugs}

Btw, my polled mama Leela gave me TWO polled babies! One buckling one doeling. So HAPPY I get to skip the iron this go-'round and keeping my polled doeling. Last year I was confused about being able to tell if they're polled but this year both babies have very round heads like golf balls and no swirls or hints of bumps. The buckling is very flashy and I sold him already ;)

Cute little buckskin boy- looks like my buck I used last year who I adore and kept as a wether.

Congratulations, Julia!  They are both lovely kids.  The buck is absolutely stunning!  At least they're healthy and your doe did well. :)

Congratulations! They're adorable. And don't feel bad; I learned this lesson the hard way, too. My third doe ever to kid, I had fed her black oil sunflower seeds while pregnant. I now know that's a HUGE no-no. She had a c-section.

I think the day we stop making mistakes is the day we die. At least we can always learn from them!

Ack!! No BOSS?? I've been giving that to all my prego does because several of their coats are so dry. Guess I'll stop. Now I'm really worried!
I gave BOSS to my pregnant girls- no fat goats so I think "all in moderation guided by individual need". For instance, when I give Chaffhaye to my queen- within 1 hour her coat goes dull. If no Chaffhaye next days- she is lovely and shiney! If I give queen Chaffhaye and BOSS and pumpkin seeds- no dullness! The other does don't show this BUT they all have different coats. But several boys have fine coats like hers and they don't go dull. So - there is no one answer! I think BOSS is great but goats are like deer- they must not be fat when pregnant for good birthing. Those poor mother deer have almost nothing to eat all winter. Farm raised deer have problems birthing as owners feed them. So complex makes the mind ache!

BOSS has a high fat content. Small amounts may be okay based on condition (not sure on that), but I was feeding too much to a doe who didn't need it. Hence, problems!

Ok well I'll have to try feeding it only to the two who have the driest coats. I noticed that one of them is really coming out of it. The other (who miscarried in January) is harder to tell because she has a light coat to begin with.

If she just miscarried in January, then you don't have anything to worry about, assuming you mean last month, not last year.

Myra Isaac said:

Ok well I'll have to try feeding it only to the two who have the driest coats. I noticed that one of them is really coming out of it. The other (who miscarried in January) is harder to tell because she has a light coat to begin with.

That's fascinating about the deer! I hadn't thought about it, but it's true. The deer around us get nothing in the winter but tree bark and whatever acorns they can find, and they certainly don't have any problem with reproducing. We don't even have any evergreens around us.

Judy Asarkof said:

 I think BOSS is great but goats are like deer- they must not be fat when pregnant for good birthing. Those poor mother deer have almost nothing to eat all winter. Farm raised deer have problems birthing as owners feed them. So complex makes the mind ache!

I've been thinking about this a lot, especially since we just had quintuplets last night. Two years ago I had a doe die from a ruptured uterus after quintuplets. I knew she was carrying five because she was already huge at 2 months. When I say that I can tell a goat's pregnant at two months, I'm not talking about sorta, maybe, she kinda looks pregnant. I mean she looked like she is about 4-5 months along by 2 months! So, that was the case with Coco two years ago, and it was going to be her second set of quints. Like you, I was worried about pregnancy toxemia, knowing that she was carrying that many kids. I was also worried about tiny little quints, so I was feeding her a lot! Years ago, I had heard that boer goat breeders do ultrasounds so they can tell which ones are carrying 3+, so they can feed them more, so I've always fed more grain to goats that I thought were carrying 3+. I was giving Coco grain for the last month of pregnancy because I was thinking that the kids couldn't get too big, knowing that she was carrying that many. Well, although they didn't get too big for her to birth them because of size, they did get too big to be able to move around inside of her and get born. The average weight on those kids was 3 pounds, meaning that poor Coco was carrying around 15 pounds of kids! That is just absurd for a ND. They were so tangled up inside of her that I was only able to pull the first one, and then I had to take her to the vet to get the other four out.

So, three months ago when I saw that Agnes was looking like she was already big enough to kid, I was thinking that she probably had quints, even though no one in her line has had them unless you go back four generations! Anyway, she got zero grain, except for the handful of grain I gave her a few days ago with COWP mixed in. These five kids born this morning ranged from 1# 15 ounces to 2# 13 ounces and all just as healthy as can be. AND when I checked the time of the photos on my phone, I realized she shot them out in 8 minutes from the first to the fifth kid! There was less than a minute between the first and second one.

So, we are all always learning! As Judy said, it's so complex, it makes your head hurt!

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