Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

I, like many of you, am just starting out on a new venture of breeding and dairy production and I have a question.. I had three Dwarf Nigerian goats.. Two werthers and one female.. Just as pets.. I recently bought three more goats.. Two males (born July 1st, 2011) and one more female in hopes that we might have the pleasure of being traumatized by a birth.. Sooo.. The adult goats have completely accepted Buster (One of my new males), but they refuse to give Bear (My other new male) a chance. My goats are NOT like most goats.. They are usually friendly, come when called and have never been caught by collars or nets (ugh.. I've seen some horrible things!!).. What can I do to help my poor little Bear? I've been letting the new kids hang out with me around the farm, but once they're back in the goat area, all hell breaks loose.. Most of the time.. Any help would be appreciated 

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I think most of this is pretty normal behavior while they all work out the new herd order. If the new goats are particularly smaller (or smaller than the others by a lot) you may add a bit of fencing to separate them (while still being visible to the other goats) until the newness wears off.
Thanks Rachel!! Hey! I was JUST looking at your photos.. Your Harriett is truely beautiful!! I love her eyes! How did you manage your first kidding?? Also, Bear was the runt out of the three kids his mother delivered, so your comment on size is kind of what I had figured.. My biggest fear was that there was something wrong with the little guy that I haven't noticed, but the other goats knew about.. If that made any sense..

I think especially with tiny goats, that all the other goats in a herd really try to "move up" in line when someone they know they can "beat" comes in...

 

As to my first kidding... I don't KNOW!! I still haven't had one!! lol Two does that haven't settled... this driving them to the buck deal makes it hard to catch them in standing heat, apparently. Especially when I'm still learning. lol I'm HOPING to get the two of them bred for Spring kidding, and then work on housing for a buck next year. Then I could breed on site. I think that will make a big difference.

 


I'd appreciate it if you'd let me know what your experience is like when you succeed.. and if my boys can get a little taller a little faster, I'll let you know how it goes for me.. I'm just glad I found this site.. My new doe, Pumpkin, is on the larger side for a Dwarf Nigerian, but at least she has had kids before and I THINK she might be going into heat.. My other doe, Kao (Hawaiian for goat) just turned 1 in March and hasn't had any kids.. yet..

 

I appreciate your comments and time and hopefully we'll be in touch soon!

 

Happy Humping!!


Rachel Whetzel said:

I think especially with tiny goats, that all the other goats in a herd really try to "move up" in line when someone they know they can "beat" comes in...

 

As to my first kidding... I don't KNOW!! I still haven't had one!! lol Two does that haven't settled... this driving them to the buck deal makes it hard to catch them in standing heat, apparently. Especially when I'm still learning. lol I'm HOPING to get the two of them bred for Spring kidding, and then work on housing for a buck next year. Then I could breed on site. I think that will make a big difference.

 

OMG, LMAO! "Happy humping!" *snicker*
Heh Heh!! I got a giggle out of that too!!

Jackie K said:
OMG, LMAO! "Happy humping!" *snicker*

I keep adding to my herd every year it seems like, we have 8 wethers and one buck ( we just like lawn mowers!) we just brought in 2 more little wethers and a buckling. The big boys boss them around for sure but we have alot of spots they can "escape" from them if they really need to, the bossyness eventually simmers down once boss goat has let them know who he is but I find there is always one that is the underdog and takes most of the picking on...hope this helps.

Donna

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