Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats

for people who love the littlest dairy goats

Ok everyone, I need some advice. I recently got an entire herd of goats. All most all of them were bred when I got them. I have a couple that have developed coughs. I am still very new to having Nigerians and I am worried about pneumonia. Since the temp has dropped so much here, the cough really worries me. So my question is what kind of antibiotics are ok for pregnant goats? Thank you in advance for everyone's help.

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I must say I'm not the most experienced goat person on here, so I hope someone else will chime in here.  I do, however, have a doe that has always coughed, so I have read anything I can about coughing.  With my doe, she has never gotten sick, nor has the cough ever fully gone away.  However, nice dry summer days she's a lot less prone to cough.  Any weather changes cause it to be worse.  The change from warm to cold is hard for her, and any change from dry to wet.

Okay, on to your issue.  I was just trying to point out that some coughs are just coughs.  I don't think that a cough is cause for an antibiotic if it's just a cough.  If there's fever involved, then an antibiotic would be in order.  Usually an illness that needs attention would be accompanied by behavior changes; less energy, not eating, less social, staring into a corner, a hunched up appearance with the tail down.  Usually these types of behaviors, if caused by infection, would have fever associated with them.  The above is what I personally go by in trying to determine of a goat of mine is really ill, or just a bit off.

Some other causes of a cough might be moldy or dusty hay, or a worm load of a type that would irritate the lungs.  Lung worms would be one, or any type that migrates to the lungs and is coughed up and swallowed, of which there are several.

The woman I got my first goats from has a property surrounded by people who heat with outdoor wood boilers.  She often gets a haze of wood smoke over her property.  She has noticed this wood smoke in the air causing some of her goats to cough.

I think coughs are the most irritating thing to try to figure out.  I was always worried about my doe for so long, but when she never got sick, freshened with triplets her first freshening, produced a respectable amount of milk for me, and now won't dry off, I finally quit worrying about it. :)

Yeah I don't want to give antibiotics unless totally necessary. One of my goats that has a cough is a wether of mine and he coughs all the time! No temp, no runny nose, I just think he coughs. I have also thought about lungworms. And it is close to reworming, so I may try that and see what happens. What about worming pregnant does? I normally give them IvomecPlus injectable orally. Or of course something like safeguard. This is my first time having pregnant does and it can't be slightly overwhelming! Thank you for your response! All advice is always greatl appreciated!

Oops!  I didn't answer your question about antibiotics.  I really don't know a whole lot about that.  I've only ever used penicillin once, and I know that 's safe during pregnancy.  I'm pretty sure that Nuflor is one you'd want to stay away from during pregnancy.

Naxcel is a great antibiotic for use in pneumonia, but requires a perscription.  This is what it says about pneumonia on the package insert for Naxcel:

Goats
Administer to goats by intramuscular injection at the dosage
of 0.5 to 1.0 mg ceftiofur per pound (1.1 to 2.2 mg/kg) of body
weight (1-2 mL reconstituted sterile solution per 100 lbs body
weight). Treatment should be repeated at 24-hour intervals for
a total of three consecutive days. Additional treatments may be
given on days four and five for animals which do not show a
satisfactory response (not recovered) after the initial three treatments. Selection of dosage (0.5 to 1.0 mg/lb) should be based
on the practitioner’s judgement of severity of disease (i.e., extent
of elevated body temperature, depressed physical appearance,
increased respiratory rate, coughing and/or loss of appetite).
Pharmacokinetic data indicate that elimination of the drug is more
rapid in lactating does. For lactating does, the high end of the
dose range is recommended.

I though that was helpful because it tells what symptoms to look for in a goat with pneumonia. :)

Thank you so much! What do you think about the different wormers for preg does?

I use Eprinex externally on my pregnant does. It's weather proof, and has zero withdrawl time. Takes care of Lungworm too. :)

I have read that IvomecPlus is safe for pregnant does on a few goat breeder websites, and it does kill lung worms.  I have a bottle of Safeguard, and it doesn't say anything on the label about pregnancy, so I'd assume it's safe, but it doesn't kill lung worms.

Best wished to you! 

Jessica stafford said:

Yeah I don't want to give antibiotics unless totally necessary. One of my goats that has a cough is a wether of mine and he coughs all the time! No temp, no runny nose, I just think he coughs. I have also thought about lungworms. And it is close to reworming, so I may try that and see what happens. What about worming pregnant does? I normally give them IvomecPlus injectable orally. Or of course something like safeguard. This is my first time having pregnant does and it can't be slightly overwhelming! Thank you for your response! All advice is always greatl appreciated!
Awesome! I think that will probably be my next step before I go to antibiotics. I have to say too that these goats came from Texas and I live in Mississippi. There is a big difference in the air from there to here!

Awesome to know, Rachel! :)

Rachel Whetzel said:

I use Eprinex externally on my pregnant does. It's weather proof, and has zero withdrawl time. Takes care of Lungworm too. :)

Do any of the goats have a temperature?

No, no temp

As others have said, coughing by itself is not necessarily a sign of illness. Do you live on a dirt road? Was the last bale of hay dusty? How often are they really coughing? Is it only when bringing up cud or when eating in a group and fighting for food? Sick goats look and act sick. If they're eating, drinking, chewing their cud, walking around, and acting goaty, they're probably fine.

Thank you all for your help! No one is acting off, so I think I'm good. No green snotty stuff either.

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